Foliage

I was invited by Where’s my Backpack.com to participate in Travel theme: Foliage.

So, I took a walk around the farm on this rainy day to capture some of our beautiful New England foliage to share with you.

The Maple trees are starting to turn as well as the blueberries and all kinds of wetland weeds. The Oaks and Chestnuts are only now barely starting to turn.

As you look at the photos, you may be thinking why so many Maples? The answer is very simple – we collect sap and make our own Maple Syrup.

Some of the leaves I came across on the ground were even prettier than those in the trees so I had to capture their beauty as well.

Enjoy and have a nice Sunday wherever you are in this big global but small internet world.

Red Maple Tree

Red Maple Tree

Maple tree

Maple tree

Maple tree turning

Maple tree turning

High bush blueberries

High bush blueberries

Weeds on the compost bin

Weeds on the compost bin

Pokeweed

Pokeweed

Maple leaf sitting on the wild raspberries

Maple leaf sitting on the wild raspberries

Fallen maple leaves that will become garden compost to complete the gardening circle of life

Fallen maple leaves that will become garden compost to complete the gardening circle of life

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About Judy @ NewEnglandGardenAndThread

Master Gardener who enjoys gardening, quilting, photography, and traveling.
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8 Responses to Foliage

  1. Pingback: Travel Theme: Foliage « The Accidental Kansan

  2. There is something very special about maples!!

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  3. Joyce says:

    I think nature blesses you so bountifully because you respect and care for it so much. Maple syrup, too? I am in awe of the many things you know how to do, and very delighted that you are sending part of the next generation forward with the same skills you have! I’m sure both grandchildren know how fortunate they are!

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    • Judy says:

      Thank you. But, the grandkids have already been laughing that with all the new Maples we tagged this fall, I’ll need a cot in the garage when I start boiling because I may never be done. The evaporation process for an individual is long, steamy and boring. But, it is a real sense of satisfaction to process your own maple syrup. Are you on Facebook or Pinterest?

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  4. Joyce says:

    The process you describe calls to mind my dear grandmother, working over her steaming pots to can what she grew, often in 90 degree weather. But there was nothing like the final product! I’m not on FB or Pinterest right now….can’t handle it – lol! And just discovered that deer ate the 2 large onion sized pumpkins we had, ones that would never have matured anyway! So you see why I admire what you do so much!

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  5. debra says:

    Hey that Pokeweed looks like the stuff that started coming up in my backyard flower area a few years back. I have to keep pulling it up and pulling it up and never knew for sure what it was….the first year, I thought it was kind of pretty but now I pull it up and out all summer because it wants to take over!!! I never knew if the berries were good or poison or what….

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  6. Grandma Kc says:

    I absolutely love the colors of maples! I think they are the prettiest!

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  7. Beautiful Yard Judy!! I want to taste some of that syrup!

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