Photography

IMG_2986A few weeks ago, I was going through family documents, photos, and other memorabilia and found this little album containing six photos.

It sure brought back memories of buying Kodak film at a drugstore, carefully loading it in the camera, rewinding out of the sun, wondering what you’d end up with, and impatiently waiting days for the film to be developed to see what your results were.

There were six photos in this little album held in with that little silver clamp.

FilmCollage

There are a lot of things that I remember fondly and find comforting about the simple, old days, but photography is not one of them. Although I do smile when I remember saving to buy a Polaroid camera and thinking it was the greatest camera ever. All that waving of wet photos so they’d dry, and now they are rainbow-yellow colored brittle pieces of paper.

Digital photography is a gift from the technology gods. (No disrespect meant.)

Shooting away at different angles and not caring how many times you press away because you know it doesn’t cost any more to take one photo or ten is a wonderful thing. And then you have the luxury of looking at the photos and being able to determine what is worth keeping and what needs to be straightened, cropped or enhanced with one of the many choices you have available.

I liked that old Brownie my grandparents had, but I don’t want to use it today, and we haven’t even discussed the little holder of flash bulbs that had to be purchased and inserted.

Eastman Kodak Photo Credit

Eastman Kodak Photo Credit

I love learning about photography and knowing what type of camera other bloggers use, so tell me – what’s your go-to camera today and why? 🙂

About Judy @ NewEnglandGardenAndThread

Master Gardener who enjoys gardening, quilting, photography, and traveling.
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46 Responses to Photography

  1. I agree! I think I had that same Brownie camera! I never was that interested in photography until we got our first digital camera. We have been through several Sony digital cameras and the one I use now is a Sony A550 with a 18/55 lens, a 18/25 lens, and a 400 lens.

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  2. sued51 says:

    I started digital photography with a Kodak EasyShare (which I still take with me when I don’t want to lug around my camera bag), but I found that my hands shake too much to take very good photos with it. I now use a Canon Rebel T3, which continues to be an adventure but allows me to experiment a little. And yes…you can take as many as you want…but I have to be better about deleting the ones that are no good after I look at them…they take up too much space!

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    • I have another blogging friend with the Canon Rebel T3, and she loves it too. I did have to laugh about deleting because I think that is the one negative (no pun intended) about being able to take as many shots as you want. I went through IPhoto on two laptops this winter deleting away – boring but had to be done. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  3. My brother still has our Dad’s Leica 35mm camera and attachments along with a Bell & Howell 8mm movie camera and projector. I remember our Dad spending hours in his darkroom ( a closet ) working on producing special effects on a photo. Digital age has transformed all that. It is interesting that I have more digital photos now than then number of photographs Dad ever had. Mine just take up less space.

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  4. Dan Antion says:

    My father had a variety of Polaroid cameras. Maybe that’s why I prefer digital to film. My go to camera these days is a Sony point and shoot. I wanted something that took good photos but that I could slip into my pocket.

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  5. Norm 2.0 says:

    I’m still going strong with my 6 year old Nikon D60 10.2 MP DSLR. I mean, I WANT a newer, better, higher resolution camera, but for 95% of what I do, it still suits me fine.

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  6. pagedogs says:

    Yes, the digital age is wonderfully liberating for photography. I don’t miss the old film days at all. My go-to camera these days is a Canon SX700 HS. It is compact and lightweight, but has a 30X lens with very good image stabilization. Although we have a Canon EOS 70D (which is a great camera), I often don’t feel like lugging a big camera, several lenses, and a tripod around, so the little Canon has become my favorite. I love it.

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  7. My very first was a Kodak Instamatic; with the little flash cubes that rotated as the photo’s were taken. I believe that the last “ROLL” of film I had developed with 36 prints cost me in excess of $20 to print; and you know how that goes….1/2 are crummy photos. I love digital for that reason and those you mention. My husband & I talk about these things alot. He was a big 35mm film camera guy; with lenses being swapped and filters and tripods. He has a bag full of lenses. I have always been more of a point and shoot person. That said, not long after I met him in 2005 I was going on a cruise with my friends and he went shopping with me for a new camera. I bought the best digital camera for my $500 budget I could get, with a single lense. I loved that camera, but boy o’ boy did it eat my AA batteries if I left them in the camera for any period of time. It took great photo’s. Meanwhile he was playing with his little Sony camcorder that fit in the palm of his hand and was delighted with it’s ability to take single shots. When I moved up to an “android” cell phone 4 years ago, I got one with a great camera. My 35mm stays at home in the camera bag in the closet. My cell phone takes such crystal clear photos that I never think of “camera” anymore. Who needs the added bulk when you are already carrying the phone. The more I play with the camera settings on the phone, the more convinced I am I will never need / want a real camera again. The pro’s of the digital age are how many times you can take the photo. The cons are that we tend to never print a photo; but save the ones we love in a digital file. I may have taken 20,000 photo’s in the last 10 years. I guess I am saving the environment by not printing; and saving my kids from throwing them all out when I am long gone. Meanwhile, our photo albums sit in the cabinet; along with boxes of photo’s taken before 2005 that need sorted and put in albums. The digital ones I pull up & look at for reference; we use as screen savers and they cycle through on otherwise blank screens and we see them often. Technology is interesting! 🙂

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    • OMG what a trip down memory lane and thank you for the chuckles. I do think about those thousands of photos we all have locked somewhere on our computer or phone that never see the light of day. When we made the cross country move, I took all our photos out of albums (lots of them) and put them in photo boxes with labeled dividers. They stack well, and I figure it will be easier for someone down the road to just toss the whole box. LOL

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  8. I actually bought an old Brownie last summer for fun. I can still get fiilm for it but so far, it is mosly decoration. Thanks for sharing your memories. Cheers.

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  9. sue says:

    My daughter and various cousins are putting together a family book. Collecting remembrances,photos etc. As they’re going along I’ve been questioned who is this, what was the occasion. One of the queries was why there aren’t more casual snaps, most are at an “event” weddings, baptisms and such. I’ve offered that back then our families were mainly farmers, laborers. Someone carrying a camera and snapping photos casually around the feed mill or small town would have been looked at askance. I also mentioned that when people were bringing home the wages of the time, a roll of film might be a bit of a splurge. They are now seeing how the various branches fared via the photos. In the age of digital and smart phones where everything is fair game, this was an eye opener.

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    • Smiling here because I took the time to write every name that I knew on all the photos I have, but they are similar to your situation in that they were events not every day life. I also remember being able to buy one roll of film and when you ended up with one or two that were just blurs it was a costly venture. Can you imagine what our grandparents would think about everyone walking around with the www, camera and video recorder in their hand 24/7? 🙂

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  10. I’m poor ( and cheap) so I use a Nikon Coolpix L320, the least expensive
    digital on the market … you get what you pay for… also, I have an older
    Olympus SP-590UZ, almost wore it out…zoom mechanisms on both are jerky
    and difficult to control. The built in color filters are also lacking, lots of out of focus
    and blurry shots, up close flower shots need the right light at the right time of day.
    Who doesn’t love to shop … it’s the spending that hurts.
    Love, hugs and happy hunting … ME and the Boss

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    • There are so many amazing cameras out there with every bell and whistle and along a gigantic price range. It just confuses the heck out of me so I love hearing what others are using successfully. I want to get a better camera and I’m going to research every one suggested here. I’ll be that nerd with a spreadsheet making notes. 🙂

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  11. Joyce says:

    I loved the memories this post brought back. A camera, film and a set of “flashcubes” were a cherished Christmas gift “back in the day!” Pictures were mostly of our cats and birthday gatherings. Results included the occasional blanks after a week’s wait on the drugstore!
    Today I use a Nikon D7100 and I really like it. Thank goodness for the default setting though!

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    • Oh the flashcube, made me smile just thinking about that little thing popping around. Good one. I’m not familiar with that model but I guarantee you I’ll be looking it up. And, they put that default setting on there for a reason – it takes good pictures. 🙂

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  12. I agree, we live in a very fun time for photographers. It’s one of the few advances in technology that I think is positive on every level. I use a Canon Rebel T3 for almost everything, although my husband’s little Sony Cybershot takes pretty good pics and comes in handy when I don’t want to carry my Canon around.

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  13. bythebriny says:

    I’m so with you on the convenience of digital photography (yay for instant gratification!). I use two Fujifilm mirrorless cameras (an X-E1 and X-T1) and have been very happy with them.

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  14. Teresa says:

    I have a Canon Power Shot SX50HS. I love it. Can’t change lenses etc. But has enough settings to do what I want it to do. They have just come out with a 60mm camera. So mine is outdated already! lol. I have had it about 2 years now and haven’t found anything that I dislike about it yet.

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  15. pbmgarden says:

    Great memories Judy! Our family had a brownie too but it looked different. For years now I’ve used a Canon PowerShot G10 but I’m always looking to upgrade.

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  16. Grandma Kc says:

    You and I have had many conversations about cameras but this did bring up some wonderful old memories. Cameras always make me think of my Dad and he loved his Minoltas and had all sorts of lenses and filters. If he were here now he would love having a digital camera! I know I spent way to much money developing pictures when Jenna was little and of course there are the ones I never got developed! PS I am still loving my T5i and I’m so glad I got it!

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  17. I’ve had a variety of cameras and all my shots from my almost-a-year in Europe in the 70’s are on slides! I think I should have them converted, but it will get a bit pricey. I started the digital age with a small Canon, then moved to an iPad (actually bought a purse that would hold it), to an iPhone less than a year and a half ago (which I love, love, love), and have finally started using my Nikon as well. I’m with you. I love the digital age!

    janet

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  18. I’m bookmarking this post for later research… I’m a ‘camerone’ slinger. I’m pretty sure I’ve coined the term. .. camera phone. Galaxy S4 16mp. Great for macro. Sucks for detailed distance. I love the convenience. Actually have a 10 x lens for it. Need more experimentation.

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  19. and then the older photos start to yellow! That’s happened with an album where most of the pictures of my oldest son when he was a baby have gone all funky : (

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  20. I mostly use a Panasonic Lumix but have fond memories of those Instamatic days, too! Loved those flashcubes!!! Thx for reviving those days again!

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  21. Judy is an avid amateur photographer and took classes in the “old” days (late 1970s). She is also in love with the brave new world of digital.

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  22. Eliza Waters says:

    Don’t miss those days at all – lol! I love my Canon Rebel – it can do a lot and I barely use its full limits, but the potential is there, I suppose. Between its auto features and my editing program, I’m pretty happy!

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  23. Dawn says:

    What fun to remember all of our old cameras. I can remember coating the Polaroid photos from my Swinger camera with a little sponge filled with solution and waving them to dry! Judy, so many times I traveled to Europe with many, many rolls of slide film in a lead-lined bag. Ugh! This past winter, I spent days at our library scanning favorite family slides to digital files. My go-to camera is a little Nikon Cool Pix. It’s small enough to carry everywhere!! Have a wonderful trip, Judy!! ♡

    Liked by 1 person

  24. I forgot the solution – oh my. It’s nice that your local library has the equipment to convert the slides. We love our local library. ❤️

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