Remember

They came to us as chubby cheeked sons and daughters. We rocked them, taught them to walk and ride a bicycle, helped them with homework and then waved as they went off to fight a war that was supposed to fix everything in the world that was wrong.

Over the history of our Country, almost three quarters of a million of our children did not return.

My grandparents sent three of their five children off to fight in World War II. They lost their two youngest sons, ages 19 and 23.

jsweetStaff Sergeant John Sweet,  493rd Bomber Squadron, 7th Bomber Group, was on a bombardment mission from Pandaveswar, India, to Moulmein, Burma, when his B-24 Liberator crew was attacked by an enemy formation and crashed into the Bay of Martaban. His service and sacrifice are remembered on the Tablets of the Missing at the Manila American Cemetery in the Phillippines.

Staff Sergeant Allen Sweet, 301st Infantry Regiment, 94th Infantry Division’s unit was expanding the Saarburg bridgehead, protecting the 10th Armored Division’s right flank and blocking the enemy’s escape from Trier, Germany, when he fell.

Our recent trip to Luxembourg was to see my Uncle Allen’s grave. I took two photos including one of my grandparents and one of my uncle and his four siblings and leaned them against the headstone so that my grandparents and their children could be together one last time.

SweetCollage

He is buried along with over 5,000 of his fellow soldiers and his commanding officer, George Patton.

GraveCollage

Several years ago, I enrolled my uncles in the database at the National World War II Memorial in Washington, D.C.

This year I found the Gold Star Family Registry where a soldier’s information and photo can be entered along with a personal tribute. If you have lost someone in any war since World War II, I would suggest checking this site out.

There are so many brave men and women who have made the ultimate sacrifice for us to live in the “…land of the free and the home of the brave” that it always seems fitting to take time out every year to celebrate the true meaning of Memorial Day.

As long as we remember, they are not forgotten.

——

The American Battle Monuments Commission honors the service, sacrifice and achievements of United States armed forces by maintaining 24 cemeteries, 25 memorials, monuments and markers in 15 countries.

 

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About Judy @ NewEnglandGardenAndThread

Master Gardener who enjoys gardening, quilting, photography, and traveling.
This entry was posted in Family and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

25 Responses to Remember

  1. Ogee says:

    A great reminder of what Memorial Day is truly about.

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  2. Denzil says:

    Lovely post Judy. It must have been so special visiting your Uncle’s grave.

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  3. Thank you for this wonderful post reminding us what Memorial Day is really about.

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  4. Pingback: Remember the fallen : FROM RAMADI, IRAQ - Frugal Little Bungalow

  5. Thank you for remembering. Great post honor those who did not return home.

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  6. Murphy's Law says:

    What a wonderful tribute to your uncles and to all our fallen heroes, men and women, who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Beautiful post.

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  7. Dan Antion says:

    Thank you for sharing your family’s story. Their sacrifice is a blessing to those that followed.

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  8. My father was wounded just outside of Germany in the Battle of Metz, Nov 14, 1944, just before they broke through into Germany. He was in the 10th Armored Division, the Division your uncle was protecting, and I presume your uncle was killed some time after they’d gotten through into Germany. My father spent the weekend before he was wounded in Luxembourg being trained. We visited an American Cemetery in France, it would have been good to see the one you were at, too. I think it’s wonderful that you were able to do that and that you brought the photo.

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  9. Your family’s sacrifice saved all of us and continued our freedom. Thank you!

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  10. Grandma Kc says:

    This is beautiful and I am so glad that you got to go and visit the grave sites. Taking those pictures with you to bring them together brought tears to me eyes. Thank you to all of the service men who have protected us over the years.

    Like

  11. Joyce says:

    Oh Judy – this is so touching. I have tears in my eyes. Your gesture of bringing the entire family together is just priceless in its beauty. What a privilege to be able to travel to the site of your uncle’s grave, and how emotional it must have been to actually lay eyes on it. I think I’d be overwhelmed at the thought of how well our young men have been cared for over so many years by such a gracious – and grateful – country! God bless them all!

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  12. What a very moving post. Thank you.

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  13. Tina Schell says:

    A beautiful tribute Judy – thanks for sharing your family’s story, and for the reminder to remember. It’s hard for those of us who have always lived in peace to imagine losing your two youngest sons. Simply beyond my powers of comprehension.

    Like

  14. 1929charmer says:

    A very lovely and moving post!

    Like

  15. Eliza Waters says:

    Beautiful remembrance and touching tribute, Judy. Their sacrifices were immense.

    Like

  16. Nancy says:

    What a beautiful tribute of your family’s sacrifice for our freedom. And you bringing the photos for them to be together again…… touching! Hugs to you!

    Like

  17. Hope you had a great Memorial Day. It’s important to remember the purpose of all of the holidays we celebrate…I think too often that gets lost in the pageantry.

    Stephanie
    http://stephie5741.blogspot.com

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  18. A wonderful post and tribute to your lost family members. It makes me ill to think about those young men and the lives they could have had.

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  19. This is great to read. We do tend to forget those are lost inwar.

    Like

  20. Pingback: Veterans Day 2015 | NewEnglandGardenAndThread

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