Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors this week is from our recent trip to Kansas. This is a beautifully restored stagecoach that is on the grounds of Fort Larned.

I don’t know the make of this coach, but history tells the story that the first stagecoaches were made in Concord, New Hampshire, in the 1820’s. In the mid 1860’s, the overland stagecoach route west of the Missouri River covered 2,500 miles from Nebraska to California and from Idaho to Arizona.

Teams of four or six horses pulled a coach at an average speed of five miles per hour, stopping every twelve miles to change horses, and every forty-five miles to let the passengers and driver eat a quick meal.

Can you imagine riding in this for days at a time, food available every nine hours, and that canvas door being the only thing between you and hostile Native American Indians?

Stayed tuned because next week’s doors will include the pristine and historic grounds of Fort Larned. I do love the history of settling this Nation and hope you do too. 🙂

What is Thursday Doors? Head on over to our leader, Norm Frampton’s, Thursday Doors, June 22, 2017, and check out the submissions from around the world.

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About NewEnglandGardenAndThread

Master Gardener who enjoys gardening, quilting, photography, and traveling.
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43 Responses to Thursday Doors

  1. Ouch! My kidneys! 😲
    I could take a 10 minute ride…

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Love the stagecoach! No, I don’t think I would want to make that trip!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Norm 2.0 says:

    Good post Judy. I remember thinking when we were in Death Valley a few years ago, how people crossed that place in contraptions like this on long haul journeys. I guess it was the best they could do at the time. Not surprising though that the train became as popular as it did. Much faster and MUCH more confortable.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I’m in pain even thinking about all that jostling and bone shaking, Judy. Although, I came across a Mark Twain quote when researching one of my books (I had a bit stagecoach travel in it). He described the ride on a Concord stage like being in “a cradle on wheels”.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Jackie says:

    I’d be worrying about the next bathroom stop! I don’t think we are as tough as they were. But then that was what they had.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Dan Antion says:

    As BArt Simpson famously said “Ooooh my ovaries…” Nine hours bouncing around behind a team of horses, the thought makes my back hurt.

    Thanks for sharing the history lesson with us, Judy. Interesting NH connection. Make you wonder if the craftsmen making these coaches knew how they would be used. If they did, I’ll bet the slept better every night.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Murphy's Law says:

    I can’t imagine what a trip was like in a stagecoach. I would’ve been okay with the time between food stops, but I would’ve been hanging out the window trying to find a port-o-potty! Lol.

    Beautiful stagecoach. Interesting history lesson.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Sue says:

    I remember asking my gramps why he up and moved the family from an Iowa farm to Michigan during the 30s depression. He said if you’re starving and getting no place where you’re at, you better find a new place…He and gram knew nothing but farm life but he worked thru and became very skilled at construction. He was very proud of the work he did on buildings at Michigan State U.
    to accommodate WW 2 vets coming in on GI Bill. I’m very gabby today but want to add. My daughter and I have been doing the family tree. Amazes me how tough or desperate or ambitious they were. Ship across the Atlantic, Ohio off to Illinois on to Iowa some farther to S Dakota. With mules and wagons. And I fret about the traffic in my air conditioned car!

    Liked by 2 people

  9. I’m struck by the fact that the horses were changed out every 12 miles – that doesn’t sound like much, but when you consider the weight that they were hauling and the terrible terrain, I’m glad to hear that the animals were given some consideration.

    The passengers on the other hand – I don’t think I’d last a 100 yards in that thing!

    Thanks for the post!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Laurie Graves says:

    Goodness me! Traveling is not my thing as it is, and the thought of traveling by stagecoach is certainly daunting.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. joyroses13 says:

    No, I can’t imagine!! I enjoy reading historical novels about those days. We think we have ti so rough sometimes!
    Thanks for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Joyce says:

    All of our present day conveniences – air travel, on-the-scene video news reporting, grocery store shopping – those stage coach riders couldn’t even imagine a world like that!
    The coach is beautifully restored – I love seeing our past preserved so respectfully!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. anglogermantranslations says:

    “Three wheels on my wagon, but I’m still rolling along…” 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  14. joey says:

    Travel must have been absolutely exhausting. I’da stayed on the east coast, I would’ve been a settler. First patch of earth with good soil and a creek, I’da been like, “I’m good, thanks.” lol
    The coach is beautiful, though, and I appreciate the restoration and the historical significance. Thanks for sharing 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  15. It’s a beautiful stagecoach. One of the prettiest I’ve seen! It must have been pretty grueling traveling cross country in a stagecoach. Reading would have been nearly impossible I imagine.

    I love the history of our Nation too, and am looking forward to next week.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Grandma Kc says:

    Can you imagine taking that trip and not having Dramamine or something to take for the motion sickness – which I know I would get! But what a beautiful stage coach and what a wonderful history lesson! Can’t wait for next week!

    Liked by 1 person

  17. slfinnell says:

    The poor children who had to endure this as well! But probably much more used to sitting still with old school ways of “children-should-be-seen-but-not-heard” mentality.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. jesh stg says:

    Such a cute carriage! Now you brought it up, the previous generations must have had real strong bones to endure trips with wooden wheels!

    Liked by 1 person

  19. You know when the doors on the old stage coach look better than your front door that you have a problem 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Rose says:

    That is a beauty, but I too am glad I don’t have to travel that way.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. germac4 says:

    Love the stage coaches Judy, and also the history lesson….many similarities between the US and Australia, and especially the vast distances the pioneers had to cross, how very resilient they had to be!

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Do you think someone could fit those coaches up with shock absorbers? I like the views through the coach windows.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. reocochran says:

    I really liked the historic details of the beautifully restored stagecoach, Judy! You had me when it was red! 😉 I think the Conestoga wagons would have been more amenable to long lasting travels and moving across the country. . . Look forward to “the rest of the story,” next week!

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Oddment says:

    I agree that these travelers were made of stern stuff. I think it’s their DNA that gives us the mettle for air travel now. Your photos impart history in the best possible way, and I too am looking forward to more next week. Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

  25. KerryCan says:

    I wondered what kind of Western doors we’d get to see from you! This is a beauty–at least from a distance of time. I cannot even begin to imagine how truly awful a long trip would be in one of these . . .

    Liked by 1 person

  26. I can only imagine how my butt would hurt ! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Brenda says:

    I was intrigued by the comment above about Twain’s quote, so did a little research. Here’s a piece on the Concord stagecoach that explains that its suspension system–heavy leather straps–took a lot of the jouncing out, allowing the coach to sway like a cradle. Fascinating. http://www.concordhistoricalsociety.org/the-concord-coach/

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Coaches look so romantic but I wouldn’t like to travel for long in one. Great photos.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Wow! Fantastic shots of this stage coach!! Such interesting history. I did not know that the first stage coaches were built in Concord. But, makes sense, when you think about it.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Joanne Sisco says:

    Five miles an hour? I’ll try to remember that the next time I want to complain about the various inconveniences of travelling by air!

    Liked by 2 people

  31. Wow. That was slow going!

    Liked by 1 person

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