How goes it?

July has arrived in New England with some really nice summer temperatures. The tomato plants are huge, there are several small tomatoes set on, the spring lettuce is almost done, the raspberries are just starting, and the lavender and hosta are beautiful.

I’ve been working on a couple of Master Gardener projects, and doing daily maintenance work here. I also went to a very interesting wicking class at the farm of a fellow Master Gardener. If you are interested in wicking, you can read the post here. If you have questions, let me know.

In between gardening adventures, I finished my small barn quilt that I attempted after my class with Nancy Morgan. What did I learn? It takes a lot of focused effort, requires logical steps, ability to sew straight over previous stitches, artistic talent, and a machine that has feet that are easily exchanged.

I made plenty of errors such as Β forgetting a window and failing to change the top thread at the right time because I was sewing from the back so some dark threads ending up showing.

Changing thread depending upon whether you were sewing on the back or the front and taking feet on and off for straight stitching or free motion quilting was a constant challenge, requiring thinking ahead, and was fairly time consuming. But, it’s okay, because I did finish it, and it turned out okay. Will I try another one – maybe so I can apply what I learned from this one.

Bottom line – whatever Nancy Morgan charges for her amazing fabric creations is worth every penny.

I also started a small red, white, and blue lap quilt in a herringbone pattern. The top is done and pinned, and the binding is pieced together part way.

I started the machine quilting but didn’t like the way it looked so spent an hour ripping it out, and now I’m back to square one literally. I need to find some inspiration for the quilting piece.

We have a week of sunshine and temperatures in the mid 80’s. It’s summer, and it is a beautiful thing.

I’ll put in some weeding and watering time this morning and then head to the sewing machine this afternoon.

Just for chuckles I’ll share how many acorn seedlings I’ve pulled out of the beds as of last week – 557. So, when I don’t comment on photos of squirrels, don’t take it personally. πŸ™‚

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About Judy @ NewEnglandGardenAndThread

Master Gardener who enjoys gardening, quilting, photography, and traveling.
This entry was posted in Gardening, Quilting and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

52 Responses to How goes it?

  1. That’s a lot of seedlings! In my yard it is pine and oak seedlings that keep me busy! Your garden is beautiful and I love the barn quilt!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Excellent job on the quilt! It looks just like the photo.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Dawn says:

    Such busy Summer days, Judy! The wicking post was fascinating. What an important way to make wise use of our precious resources! You are an amazing quilt artist, Judy! I’m so impressed by your beautiful Small Barn Quilt!! I love the contrast between the graphic, straight lines of the barn quilting and the soft, swirling quilting on the sky, grass, and greenery. You have the rare combination of artistry, great skill, dedication, determination, and vision, Judy! I love your new red, white, and blue quilt project, too. I have always loved red and white quilts! How would quilting in the shape of primitive stars look? Keep making the most of each day, my friend! β™‘

    Liked by 2 people

    • I’m glad you liked the wicking. It was fascinating to see, and he even has a system for starting seeds where he sits peat pots on handiwipes that have one part in water and the other part under the peat pots. He’s definitely got it down to a science. πŸ™‚ Dawn, you are definitely a creative inspiration. I’ll be looking up primitive stars and seeing if they will fit. I love the idea, so thank you very much. πŸ™‚

      Like

  4. Joyce says:

    Your beautiful harvest reminds me of The Little Red Hen! – she did all the work (while the rest of us just sat here reading your blog and marveling at all required!) – and now she is going to eat the harvest all by herself – thank you very much! And that’s the way it should be! (Say I, eating store berries dotted with mold and “plastic” tasteless tomatoes!
    I love your fabric quilt. I think I’d go nuts thinking in reverse as I worked. But the results are amazing and the process a great exercise for the brain!
    LOL on the squirrels! Over here they are our little pets – I put out daily buffets of berries and peanuts and my cats and I plaster ourselves at the windows to watch. The deck is covered in shells and occasionally one of the critters gets so bold and demanding at the door that I think he’s going to waltz right in and drag the entire 10 lb. peanut bag home! One man’s nuisance is another man’s daily entertainment! πŸ™‚
    Now I need to check out “wicking!” Thanks for a fun post!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I was thinking about you when I did that barn. Your creative, artistic skills would have served you well on that. I have numerous friends who love the furry little creatures, and I am thrilled for all of you as you watch their acrobatics. And, you are right about one person’s work is another’s entertainment. So, go forth and enjoy, and I’m headed out to pull more seedlings I’m sure. πŸ™‚

      Like

      • Joyce says:

        πŸ™‚ at least my own squirrels aren’t the ones who make extra work for you! – they’re right here, perched in the trees, waiting for me to toss peanuts! – kind of a creepy feeling sometimes!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. pbmgarden says:

    557! Judy, you’re amazing. I admire your quilting handiwork. Summer temps here too but probably a lot stickier than where you are. I love summer though so no complaints. Take care.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Joanne Sisco says:

    Your garden is showing the effect of all your care and attention! … and the bunny is a nice touch in the hostas πŸ™‚

    I think we’re too hard on ourselves in our own projects. We’re too close to it and see all its ‘flaws’. To everyone else, it looks amazing. I think your finished quilt is a piece of art! I can’t imagine having the patience and attention to detail to start a project like this, let alone finishing it!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Laurie Graves says:

    Yes, love the little bunny! So cute! And that quilt. Wow! Hats off to you, Judy. To make a quilt like that is beyond my wildest dreams. Logic and sewing are not my strong points, but how I admire those skills in others.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Almost Iowa says:

    Gardening, quilting, sounds like summer around here. Throw in a dog who just emerged coal black from a drainage ditch and you will have our day down perfect.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Squirrels are the enemy πŸ˜‚πŸ€£πŸ˜‚
    Love the barn quilt! That is some intrigue stitching.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. joyroses13 says:

    OH my gosh! LOL! about the seedlings! I’ll try to not post any pictures of squirrels πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  11. pastpeter says:

    80s daily here too, thanks to the ocean… much to be grateful for, before we get to the dog days of heat and humidity. Don’t you love how fresh hostas are early in the season!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. You have been busy! I wasn’t able to put in a vegetable garden in this year so I’m living vicariously through others. Enjoy your tomatoes! Your quilt is lovely. Any mistakes aren’t apparent to others and they give you a chance to learn. I’m sure Nancy’s first quilt wasn’t perfect either.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Your garden is luscious, the Barn quilt is lovely and so detailed! With the feet changing on the machine my first thought was, “Oh, to have two machines each with a different foot mounted would be ideal!”
    I always thought it would be wonderful to have a Serger plus my sewing machine, but I really, really have to be motivated to sew b/c I’m really not good at it, and spend more time ripping out; so much so it takes me two to three times longer to make something than it would someone who can sew.

    I just don’t have the engineering mind it takes to “see” inside out, and right-side out, and sew it correctly. My Mother can sew, but the talent skipped me. I wouldn’t even attempt one these quilted creations! Best of luck finding your inspiration for the Flag themed quilt. I’m looking forward to see what you do with that next.

    WHOA! That’s an orchard you pulled out in acorns!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Funny you mention two machines because I was talking to another quilter about the constant changing of the feet and that’s what she said – she keeps two machines and just moves the project back and forth. πŸ™‚ I have a serger that I take in and out of the closet as needed. It is a wonderful machine for garments or certain craft projects where you want reinforced permanent seams. I pulled another 56 of those blasted acorn seedlings this morning. I’ve been pulling weeds for years and I can never remember a season for sprouting acorns like this. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  14. See? If you hadn’t mentioned the missing window, I wouldn’t have noticed. I have great admiration for you and other quilters. Machine quilting is in a class of it’s own. Even with the proper machine, I am intimidated.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Oddment says:

    You’ve been busier than the squirrels! I am, as always, in awe of your skills with fabric — congratulations on your fabric barn! I think it’s amazing. And I’m so pleased to see how gorgeous your garden is; it did seem for a while there as though gardening days would never come to New England. It’s all lovely!

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Judy, your barn is great. Well done. And congratulations on your perseverance with pulling out all those darn seedlings. I would have given up long ago and been content to live in a forest. πŸ˜€

    Liked by 1 person

  17. germac4 says:

    Your garden is looking great, and as for the quilt …Judy it is amazing! Apart from all the other skills you need to make a quilt, I think mathematically ability is up there too. Every ( small) quilt I tried could be called “off-centre”… Nothing ever lined up or connected! I knew when to quit. 557 seedlings…..so maybe squirrels are worse than cockatoos. . Enjoy your lovely summer weather.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Dan Antion says:

    The quilt is beautiful, Judy. I’m trying to imagine working from the back side. It’s making my head hurt a little πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Rose says:

    I love the barn quilt…I cannot settle my mind enough to read about the wicking, but want to later…

    Liked by 1 person

  20. joey says:

    Oh well done! I think it’s wonderful! I could never manage all the details of such a project.
    And I looooove your lavender. I’ve tried to grow it twice from seed, and I’m sad to say, No Dice.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Really beautiful, Judy! What a very good life you live! Fairly decent weather here as well, some rain this evening possibly. Have not had much time in the studio here, a quilt that has been sitting for too long a time and many skeins of wool to dye! Long hours outdoors! So glad your days are filled with all that you love and all that you are so very accomplished at! Happy day to you, Judy!

    Liked by 1 person

  22. 557 acorn seedlings! Now you’ve got my competitive juices flowing. I wonder if I should start counting maple and elm seedlings.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Murphy's Law says:

    LOVE the small barn quilt. What an incredible job you did….and the couple of “goofs” aren’t worth mentioning. Amazing first time venture. Nancy Morgan would be proud.
    Can’t wait to see herringbone quilt finished.

    Your plants are gorgeous. I love lavender, but like Joey, I have no luck growing it.

    Enjoy this great weather and working in your garden.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I can divide and multiple any plant out there except one on a woody stem like lavender. I tried a couple of ways last year to create new plants but was totally unsuccessful. So, I bought more plants this year. That I can do. πŸ™‚

      Like

  24. slfinnell says:

    Free motion quilting is Not easy. You did a really great job! I’m a walking foot kind of girl or else I do it by hand. Not much inbetween for me lol I say ship the squirrels to their own island! They tore down my corn last year 😦

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Annie says:

    Two new beautiful quilts. Congratulations! I’d love to have your talents. Gardens are full in our yard but, yikes, it’s beginning to feel dry again! I bring out the hose in the mornings and soak a few plants but my fingers crossed for a nice soaking rainstorm in the forecast for tomorrow.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. KerryCan says:

    Wow–that maiden voyage with the quilt technique turned out very well! And I do hope you do another scene, soon, to apply what you’ve learned–I suspect practice is the key with this approach!

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Wow – beautiful quilt! I am so impressed!

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Judy your barn quilt piece is amazing!!!!!!!!! Love it. Looking at your photo were I hand quilting your herring bone top I’d probaby outline each 1/4 inch or so in, using perle cotton and big-stitching, alternating red and white threads.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Brenda says:

    It’s high New England summer here in Maine too. Incomparable–it must be some of the best weather in the world. Your barn quilt came out beautifully. I especially love the leafy fabric on the tree tops. Gorgeous effect. I wouldn’t have the patience for that type of quilting so my hat is (very far) off to you. Enjoy this lovely time of year and all the bounty from your garden. Too bad acorns don’t taste better!

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Tina Schell says:

    You’re amazing Judy, the quilt is beautiful and your garden is beyond comprehension. I’m visiting w my brother and his wife is an amazing gardener. I know how much work AND talent goes into it!

    Liked by 1 person

  31. reocochran says:

    Judy, thanks for reading my pre-scheduled baseball posts and then, my spontaneous brewery restaurant posts! I want to say a personal cheers to you and clink a glass 🍻 to your completing a beautiful rendition of the brown barn.
    I do pen and ink drawings where my perspective is “off” and it may seem my porch is falling off the house! Your quilt has a lot of great details and I really liked the texture you added. Tiny windows aren’t noticeable to me compared to your overall gorgeous composition and craftsmanship.
    A+ in my book! 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you! I’m glad you liked it. Artistic perspective is something I think you are either born with, develop or don’t have a speck of, and I’m in the later. I guess I make up for it by being stubborn and not giving up until it looks right. I may have to try one more. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      • reocochran says:

        I think you have quite a bit more than a “speck” of talent, Judy!
        I’m sure being stubborn also helps. πŸ™‚ I truly enjoyed this, which reminded me of my elderly, great Aunt Marie who worked on a quilt featuring Motif # 1 (the Rockport, Massachusetts lobster house.) Only instead of doing incredible stitches she found a fabric which looked like the red barn, black vertcal stripes on red fabric.
        Just wondering, is it a new “thing” to add stitching upon the fabric to create textures? I don’t think she did this. . .
        I bet your next one will be every bit as beautiful, Judy!

        Liked by 1 person

      • I think the true fabric artist like Nancy Morgan switches from straight stitching to free motion quilting to give it depth because she frames each one of hers under glass like a painting. I bet your Aunt’s lobster house was beautiful. πŸ™‚

        Like

  32. Beautiful restful images. I’m ready to retire in New England.

    Liked by 1 person

  33. Nadezda says:

    So many acorns, Judy! Sure, it was a terrible work, naughty squirrels. I like your new ‘Barn’ quilt, I’ve attentively looked and learned you used cloths with different structure, that transmit the wood and grass. Good luck with your new quilt!

    Liked by 1 person

  34. Wow, that barn quilt is incredible! It’s really cool seeing the backside of it with the quilting stitches and all. And lovely hostas. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

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