Life

I’ve been off my game this week because life got in my way. I hate it when that happens.

It has been a week of medical visits and complications from an eye surgery that didn’t go wrong but didn’t go as smoothly as anticipated. It will work itself out, but it’s taking longer and causing a few challenges.

I’m guessing lifeΒ doesn’t care that itΒ is prime gardening time for me or that I can’t really sew, quilt or read all the blog posts I want with only one good eye. Good thing I finished my red/white/blue herringbone lap quilt last weekend. Thanks, Dawn, for the suggestion to use primitive stars.

I just keep telling myself ‘suck it up buttercup’ and keep on doing what I can. So, my husband drove me to a nursery, and I bought a new beautiful red bee balm. I feel better already. I can’t bend over to plant it, but that’s where a helpful husband comes in handy. πŸ™‚

We’ve been going out between 6-7 a.m. to pick raspberries. We’re still averaging three pints a day. We’ve got almost 15 pounds in the freezer so far.

I ate my first ripe cherry tomato yesterday – no photo, it was gone too quickly. The daylilies are still putting on a show, but the hydrangea are starting to give them some competition. We have a lot of hydrangea including Annabelle Mopheads, which I love.

Normally, I read a lot which is somewhat challenging as well, but I tried an audio book which has been pretty enjoyable but slower – new experience so that is always good.

Hope your weekend is a good one. I’m missing a boat ride and a tour of Celia Thaxter’s garden on the Isle of Shoals tomorrow with fellow master gardeners. Now, that is a bummer.

However, there is also something I’m very thankful for this week, and that is we escaped the wicked storm that came through on Thursday afternoon. Numerous homes in our immediate area were severely damaged by high winds and downed trees. We only had a large dead branch come down, which was really a good thing, and our power stayed on while we enjoy 90 degree days.

So, if you’re looking for me this weekend, you may find me right here in the shade of the side yard listening to an audio book and trying not to notice the weeds that aren’t getting pulled. πŸ™‚

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About NewEnglandGardenAndThread

Master Gardener who enjoys gardening, quilting, photography, and traveling.
This entry was posted in Gardening, New England and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

66 Responses to Life

  1. I hate when life gets in the way of what we enjoy doing! Here’s hoping your eye recovers quickly and you are back pulling those weeds soon. Love the herringbone lap quilt!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Your side yard looks like a great place to relax and attempt to ignore what you can’t do right now. I know how difficult that is! Praying that you’re back to health very, very soon but that, in the meantime, you can relax and enjoy what you can do and the break. I’m really glad you escaped any storm damage. We’ve been having storms here, but although they’re dumping a lot of rain, causing flooding (thankfully not impacting us), the terrible winds haven’t been present.

    I love your lap quilt and I’m with you on audio books. I like them, but they’re so much slower than actual reading. 😦 I’ve been known, when getting home from a trip where I couldn’t finish the audio, to get the book from the library so I can finish it more quickly. That being said, they do make a trip more enjoyable and are a blessing in situations like yours! I think buying a plant is for you what getting a new book is for me.

    janet

    Liked by 2 people

  3. quilt32 says:

    My eyes tire so quickly any more when I read that I’ve been listening to audio books. I just finished one that was so good I have to recommend it. It’s a mystery/crime story-type thing named Terminal City by Linda Fairstein. The book itself is very good, but the star is the narrator, Barbara Rosenblat. Apparently, she’s world famous and wins all of the awards. Her mastery of dialects, accents and regional voices is amazing and now I’m going to be looking for books that she reads, no matter what the subject is. I hope you’re able to get back to all of your normal chores very soon.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Brenda says:

    Sometimes life is telling us that it’s time to take a break! Sorry to hear about your eye and I hope it resolves quickly so that you are back to doing all the things you love. In the meantime, enjoy that beautiful side yard.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I so feel you sister!
    My tooth pull didn’t go textbook style either… its been a week and I’m still in agony. πŸ€•
    How many raspberry bushes do you have to produce that much? I’m going to get some soon, they’re so easy to maintain.πŸ˜‹

    Liked by 1 person

    • I don’t know exactly how many plants there are, but the row is between 10-12 feet long. I started with maybe 15 that were runners from my daughter’s row. This row is about five years old. I prune out all the dead fruiting branches at the end of the season, and they come right back. We picked almost five pints on Sunday – biggest haul ever. My freezer is packed with them. They are easy keepers. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Oddment says:

    Oh, Judy, I am so sorry! Vision is part of every moment, even without all the art forms you need eyes for. I’m very glad that all will be well, but in the meantime “suck it up” is easier said than done when you need to see. That is a quilt in the red and white on the side of your post? Good glory, I’d go nuts trying to accomplish such a thing! But what a beauty! Ditto that side yard — wow, what a beautiful place! I know that when you try to rest there you’ll be hearing the weeds grow; it’s the gardener’s way. I’m pulling for a perfect healing.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. germac4 says:

    Oh Judy … What a thing to happen in the middle of summer! Hope life gets back to normal very quickly. Best wishes beaming in from Australia.. πŸ˜€πŸ˜Š

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Mabel Kwong says:

    So sorry to hear about the eye complications and hopefully you are on the mend. Your husband was very kind and nice to treat you to a red bee balm. Very thoughtful and he must have really wanted to cheer you up πŸ™‚ That ripe cherry tomato must be really delicious and maybe a lot more cherry tomatoes to ripen and put on the dinner table soon. Have a good weekend and enjoy sitting in the garden, listening to your audiobook and admiring the garden. Take it easy πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  9. May you be fully recovered soon

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Judy I hope you’re feeling better soon. Enjoy your garden and audio book!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. pastpeter says:

    Heal soon, Judy, and try to enjoy the enforced rest! Astilbe and hosta – my idea of a shady side yard! Nice work!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Joyce says:

    I was going to just comment on your beautiful, patriotic lap quilt and the tremendous yield from your raspberry bushes – and then I saw your side yard picture! So elegant and inviting! It was fun to recognize some of your hosta plants. They grow well for me – especially a variety called “Spilled Milk.” That one has streaks of white and seems to really enjoy living here. I’ve been able to split in up in past falls and replant for an extra three or so. I tried Astilbe once, but they didn’t last a week! Impatiens and hosta. Only those two like me!
    I wish you a speedy full recovery. For a real Energizer Bunny like yourself, it’s even more difficult to be forced to slow down for a bit!

    Liked by 1 person

    • This sitting out has been tough, but that’s life. πŸ™‚ I don’t have that Hosta but looked it up – quite lovely. Wish we lived closer because I have a few that look similar that would be nice companions for you. πŸ™‚ We did that side yard sitting area this year. I found those chairs, and they are really comfortable with cup holders too. So, I just started taking out plants until I had a spot big enough for the chairs. I moved the plants around, and we’ve enjoyed the shady spot ever since.

      Like

      • Joyce says:

        Wish I could send you some cuttings of my “Spilt Milk” because I love it so much, but that wouldn’t work, would it? (I know I could send “corms” – I remember that from Biology class!) but hosta is not one of those – right?

        Liked by 1 person

      • I’m impressed you can remember anything from Biology class. πŸ™‚ I just looked to see if one could ship a plant from one state to another and it looks like you have to adhere to each state’s rules and regs that the plant passes through. I think I just need to buy me a Split Milk. πŸ™‚

        Like

  13. I’m so sorry to hear about your eye challenge! Sending you healing thoughts and prayers… and wishes for weeds that miraculously wither and wilt on their own.

    Liked by 2 people

  14. Murphy's Law says:

    That transition time between cataract surgeries is difficult, then add to the equation that surgery didn’t go text book. Hopefully the healing process is quick and you can put this behind you very soon.

    Your quilt is simply beautiful!! And your side garden looks so inviting. Nope, I don’t see any weeds, just beautiful plants! πŸ˜„

    Audio book was a good idea. Even slow it has to help fill up the time you now have on your hands! Good time to catch up on phone calls.

    Sending good thoughts your way my friend. And what a bummer. You probably can’t even give anyone the Evil Eye right now! Lol.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Dawn says:

    Sending love and healing thoughts, dear Judy! Take plenty of time to rest, listen to audio books, and dream your garden dreams. Those chairs in your beautiful side garden are calling you to relax and sip iced tea, surrounded by the beauty of all those hostas and astilbe in bloom. Judy, your red and white quilt is absolutely gorgeous!! I love the primitive stars… perfection! Sending hugs across the miles! β™‘

    Liked by 1 person

  16. quiltify says:

    Audio books saved my in 2016! And they sure help me to do chores, as well.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Your side yard looks like the perfect place to relax and recover. I guess the silver lining would be that weeds are harder to see with one eye. Close the other one and they go away completely!

    Liked by 3 people

  18. Joanne Sisco says:

    Don’t you just hate it when things don’t go according to plan?! Well, when you don’t have much of a choice, all you can do is relax and enjoy the reduced pace while you can … and you have a lovely spot to do it in πŸ™‚

    Liked by 3 people

  19. Your side-yard looks like a beautiful place to relax in with a good book.
    I love those great, big Hydrangea heads too. I have one Hydrangea plant and am so thankful it does its thing without any help from me.

    Your lap quilt is lovely!

    I hope your eye heals and works itself out quickly!

    Liked by 1 person

  20. joyroses13 says:

    Life does have a way of getting “in the way” sometimes doesn’t it!
    Sorry about the complications with your eyes. Hope they are healed soon!
    So nice of hubby to help cheer you! And hey now you don’t have to feel guilty for not pulling weeds you have a legitimate excuse! Soak in being able to relax! And hopefully you can be back to your gardening soon!

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Dan Antion says:

    I hope you recovery and are feeling better soon, Judy. The quilt is besutiful. I’m jealous of the one tomato but I understand the whole no picture thing. Just as well, I’d be more jealous 😏

    Take it easy. Get well!

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Maybe it’s a good time to close your eyes and dream of all the things you want to do next:^) Hope you heal quickly!

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Rose says:

    I can sort of imagine being with only one eye…I had to wear an eye patch for two or three days only and that was bad enough. I hope things improve soon. Oh, like your quilt…

    Liked by 1 person

  24. It’ll be okay. Soon. It’s summer. Listen to your audio books. Relax. Enjoy the time off!

    Liked by 1 person

  25. KerryCan says:

    Wow–reading this made me think about how hard it would be to have eyesight compromised, even temporarily! I hate thinking about it! You seem to be being very sensible and patient–keep that up!

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Take care, Judy and give yourself time to heal. The garden and quilts and stitching will still be there when your eye is better. Your red and white quilt is gorgeous.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. slfinnell says:

    Being forced to slow down is the worst! Each time I’ve been recovering from surgeries I really had to rethink the little things we take for granted. Independent women have the toughest time with that. Makes you so thankful once normalcy returns. And it will so sit back and let your loved ones wait on you for a change. The primitive stars were a lovely way to make your quilt pop! Take care!

    Liked by 2 people

  28. joey says:

    Oh that’s such a bummer, I hope healing moves more speedily. That missing out feeling is rotten when it’s due to one’s body 😦
    The garden does not look bad — you need only to see the weeds around my tree in the shade garden to feel better! Hah!
    Still wow on those raspberries though! Dang! πŸ˜›

    Liked by 1 person

  29. pbmgarden says:

    Judy, sorry to hear about your setback. Never a good time to fit in something like the eye problem, but summer is time to get on with things isn’t it? Speedy recovery.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Nadezda says:

    Dear Judy, I’m sorry to hear you have some problem with your eye. Oh, yes we aren’t too young to recover fast, I had an operation in June and till nowI am getting better but it’s not finally. So I wish you get well in your time. I’m sure weeds do not grow quickly and your quilt waits you quietly. Nice place to sit, to snup and listen to the book. Love your monarda, I have the same and use its fragrant leaves with tea.
    Have a nice day!

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Kelleyn says:

    Sorry about your eye! I hope it heals well! Have a great week!

    Like

  32. Laurie Graves says:

    Lovely, lovely garden. I know just what you mean about not being able to do the things you love. Hope that eye is soon back to normal so that you can go back to being your own busy self.

    Liked by 2 people

  33. Ruth says:

    Hope your eye heals soon so you can return to your passions. Those raspberries are like jewels. Like the stars stitched in your herringbone quilt, too. And I’ve just started with Audiobooks so I can knit simultaneously as my reading was keeping me from projects. Still Life by Louise Penny was very good. My sister said read/listen in order. Any recommendations?

    Liked by 1 person

  34. First of all I am happy to hear that your property didn’t suffer any damage and then sorry to hear that you are having troubles after the surgery. Just hang in there. Love the herringbone quilt project…you’ll heal and create many more lovelies just like it. I can feel your frustration / reminds me of the calf injury of months ago where I couldn’t do Jack ShI* and it made me nuts. I know how you must be fretting.

    Liked by 1 person

  35. Annie says:

    I have two neighbors who have recently undergone tricky eye surgery. Just sharing their concerns and limitations, it makes a person appreciate more that wonderful sense of sight. I hope your recovery goes well. Audio books seem slow to me, too. Then I discovered you can speed up the reading. That helps…

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Weeds – what weeds? Hope your eye gets better. Enjoy the audiobooks.

    Liked by 1 person

  37. Funny how life slows us down periodically whether we like it or not. Sounds like you have the right attitude about it all anyway. That bee balm would definitely lift the spirits now, wouldn’t it?!

    Liked by 1 person

  38. jesh stg says:

    Love your herringbone quilt! Am doing something similar – have been painting on a mammoth painting -10 x 17 feet – so I consider that my work. Today (Friday) I leave the painting “as is” and am going to do some relaxing and spending the day in Sacramento (a 1/2 hrs. away) to do groceries and hanging out in the coffee shop Peets:) have a great time finishing your audio book!

    Liked by 1 person

  39. Grandma Kc says:

    Oh Judy, I am so sorry to hear that your eye surgery has not gone well. Just sit in that side yard and maybe sip a beer or two and enjoy your book. The weeds will wait for you! HUGS!

    Liked by 1 person

  40. Tina Schell says:

    Bummer Judy – hang in there, I’m sure by now you’re feeling better. Right????? And the weeds can wait. Enjoy your time off πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

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  42. reocochran says:

    My sympathy is with you about your eye, Judy. I am very sorry and worried. . .
    I have had three surgeries on my eyes. Both eyes had narrow eye glaucoma, which required laser surgery to drill a hole beneath each pupil to create a drainage “ditch” to prevent my smooth eye surface to go back to being wrinkled like folds in a curtain. (My doctor’s explanation of glaucoma.) Then, I also didn’t have an eventless cataract surgery. I told each nurse that I get faint when I don’t eat, my blood pressure is low to start with also. Did they prepare properly? I’m not sure, Judy. Three times I mentioned oral surgery took twice as long for me to come out from anaesthetics, same with the midnight stuff they use during colonoscopy.
    In the middle of the doctor placing my lens into my eye, my BP dropped. I heard the nurse say, “Doctor her blood pressure is dropping!” He said “Put something (not sure what it was) into her drip.” Also, he loudly said, “Tip the table, head down.”
    My eye was pooled with blood for two weeks and it feels like I either have sand or my eye in the wind has a “flap.” I have worn contacts for years so I am used to eye discomfort, but not this. Not sure if misery likes company but it may be a cautionary tale.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I hated to hit ‘like’ on your comment, friend. I have a different type glaucoma and during the surgery the dr said that my cataract was taking ever ounce of his education and experience to get out. I’ve also had the laser surgery to open the drainage. I also happened to be the only patient they’ve ever had whose eye pressure spiked extremely high after the surgery. I got to spend the afternoon in the dr office having the pressure checked every 30 minutes before I could go home. I wish you and everyone else good eye health – not fun. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      • reocochran says:

        I’m very sad to hear of your eye challenges, Judy.
        My Mom was 80 when she had her cataract surgeries.
        Hers went smoothly but she is not good at using eye drops (the lubricating, no chlorine or bleaching agents in the ingredients kind.) She doesn’t like the natural tears eye lubricating solution either.
        I try to rest my eyes after work and hope for the best. πŸ™‚
        It was rather disheartening to hear of your own complications. This means any other surgeries have potential of difficulties.
        I wish all friends better use of hats, sunglasses and following doctor appointments. πŸ™‚ Hope no more problems for you, my dear! xo πŸ’

        Liked by 1 person

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