Thursday Doors

I spent my youth watching westerns at the Proctor movie theatre on Sunday afternoons. So, when I heard about a NH stagecoach stop circa 1820 that had been saved, I had to check it out.

The Webster Stagecoach Stop and Store is located in Danville, a tiny town in the adjacent county of Rockingham with a current population of around 4,000.

Nathanial Webster, a distant cousin of Daniel’s, was the store owner. He was also the postmaster for the town of 300 from 1825 to 1836.

History tells us there was an adjacent stable where the coach horses were fed and watered. Passengers could buy items from the store that occupied one half of the small building while the other half was a workshop.

Nathaniel Webster died in 1897, but his family maintained the store for several years after.

The Portsmouth to Concord run went through Exeter, Kingston, Hampstead, and Chester. Because of its small size, Danville was not a regular stop but just as needed to pick up and drop off mail. The return trip stopped in Deerfield, Nottingham, and Newmarket.

Boarding stops were mostly at taverns, and tickets were purchased by those fairly well off. Most regular folks did not have the money and rode a horse or walked.

The building is now part of the New Hampshire Register of Historic Places. In September 2008, the building was actually moved across the road to its current location in an effort to maintain the integrity of the building and the history.

I do love a good western. 🀠

If you like doors, Β ride on over to visit our foreman, Norm Frampton at Thursday Doors, September 28, 2017, and check out a corral of doors from all over.

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About Judy @ NewEnglandGardenAndThread

Master Gardener who enjoys gardening, quilting, photography, and traveling.
This entry was posted in Photography, Thursday Doors and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

35 Responses to Thursday Doors

  1. Dan Antion says:

    Oh my, Judy, I love that door! You can sense the history in that building. I am so glad the preserved it. When you consider distance in the 1800s as compared to the way we think about distance today, you really have to struggle to put it in perspective. Traveling by stagecoach always looked so interesting in those westerns (except when the folks were being robbed), but I imagine it wasn’t the most comfortable way to travel.

    Thanks for going to check this out and sharing it with us!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. joey says:

    Gorgeous share, Judy. Great door and what a treasure to see it’s been kept.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Murphy's Law says:

    What a great door! Thanks for the interesting history lesson. So glad it was preserved. But once again an old building with two different front windows! And only one shutter.

    Yeah, me thinks riding in a stagecoach is best done from the recliner in the living room while watching a western!! Lol.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. pastpeter says:

    Great story! Love the building, especially the door.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. What an interesting story. Thanks for sharing with us, Judy.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Great ambiance, Judy. I’ve seen stagecoaches up close and they would be might uncomfortable, especially as you’d be crammed in there with lots of other people, most of whom didn’t bathe often. πŸ™‚ Thanks for the trip back into the “good old days.” Makes me thankful for my van or even the Megabus.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Joanne Sisco says:

    Those early stagecoaches would have been uncomfortable on our modern roads, let alone the bumpy dirt roads of the past. In fact, growing up in a small town in the North, those dirt roads are a memory from my youth! The springtime was particularly bad.

    This is a great door made even better by being on a slider. Love those!!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Laurie Graves says:

    Life in times past. A lovely way to remember. Doors are portals to many things.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Norm 2.0 says:

    It wonderful that they preserved this precious piece of history. Thinking of stagecoaches as a means of travel? No thanks, that’s a little too bumpy for me. It just reminds me of how much we take for granted all the options we have at our disposal today.
    Great post Judy πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Remarkably, we have been to Danville. Not once, either.

    I especially love a good EASTERN Western πŸ™‚ We saw a couple of the original stagecoaches when we were at the Tuskegee Airmen exhibit. I thought they were quite spiffy.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Lovely door and building. I am always so relieved when buildings are “saved” or “renovated” and the original character is maintained. It just wouldn’t be the same if the door had been made to look like new.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Joyce says:

    Beautiful door and fascinating glimpse to the past! I learned things about the stagecoach era from watching Rick on Pawn Stars! Not only cramped, uncomfortable seating on bumpy roads, but constant state of alert for robbers – with an armed guard watching for them. Rick sells the rifles and strong boxes they used. He’d go nuts over that door! I’m glad this building is preserved in its entirety. It is wonderful in its simple elegance!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. ortensia72 says:

    Beautiful place🌺

    Liked by 1 person

  14. germac4 says:

    I was brought up on a diet of westerns …. absolutely loved them … And I was pleased to discover one of my ancestors was a stage coach driver (in England) .. But it did make me think about how uncomfortable it would be & you could get held up and shot at any point! If I get to New England one day I’d love to see Webster Stagecoach Stop & Store

    Liked by 2 people

  15. jesh stg says:

    Like everything about this building! It couldn’t look more American, haha:)

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Eliza Waters says:

    It’s nice they preserved it – lots of buildings like this were left to ruin.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. prior.. says:

    so nice to see this – not sure I have seen a stagecoach in person – great choice and glad you made the 2 hr drive to see and share with us :_)

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Oddment says:

    You got me at the end — that little face with the cowboy hat. I vote with everyone who says that a stagecoach ride is better watched in a movie than actually experienced; that must have been the world’s worst backache. But what a critical part of our common story. Thanks for the interesting history!

    Liked by 1 person

  19. love the door, the building and the interesting history lesson! πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Grandma Kc says:

    Wonderful doors! You are surrounded by so much cool history. thanks for sharing it!

    Liked by 1 person

  21. KerryCan says:

    So, the door slides on a track, right? I’ve always wanted that sort of door, somewhere at my house! Think how uncomfortable traveling by stagecoach must’ve been . . .

    Liked by 1 person

  22. What an interesting building. I strongly believe that small everyday buildings are more important socially and historically than huge mansions and homes of the rich. They reflect real life and should be preserved as a priority over the big boys.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Maywyn says:

    Wonderful door and history, Thank you
    The wide door makes me wonder if animals were ever housed in there or maybe for freight to fit through the door. Interesting old building.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. What a neat door, and piece of history you found to share!

    Liked by 1 person

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