Thursday Doors

Photo credit: South Strand News

Hopsewee Plantation was built in 1735 and is about 13 miles south of Georgetown, South Carolina. It was the birthplace of Thomas Lynch, Jr., one of the three signers of the Declaration of Independence from South Carolina.

In the 1700’s, Hopsewee was a rice plantation of 13,000 areas. During the Civil War years of 1861-65, it was abandoned, looted by northern soldiers, and the property given to the remaining slaves. Rice was never planted again, but the slaves continued to work the property for their own use. According to historical records, there were 178 slaves there in 1850.

Hopsewee has been preserved rather than restored and is pretty much the same as when it was first built. In 1971, it was declared a National Historic Landmark.

The landscaping is embellished with beautiful camellias everywhere you turn.

The house is a typical lowcountry rice plantation dwelling made from black cypress trees and siting on a brick foundation which creates a cellar. Each floor consists of four rooms off a central hall.  The front door of the home faces the North Santee River which is where visitors arrived since that was the way most people traveled in the 1700’s.

Yesterday, I went to a ladies’ luncheon at the River Oak Cottage Tea Room. I enjoyed a delicious meal including lemonade, salad, shrimp and grits, and pound cake with a praline type frosting.

Historic property, delightful lunch, good friends, and we even ended the day with a spectacular sunset.

Hope you enjoyed this week’s doors because I certainly enjoyed gathering them. Happy Valentine’s Day everyone. ❤️

Linked to Norm Frampton’s Thursday Doors, February 14, 2019

About Judy @ NewEnglandGardenAndThread

Master Gardener who enjoys gardening, quilting, photography, and traveling.
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45 Responses to Thursday Doors

  1. Of all the times we’ve been to Pawleys Island, we’ve never been to Hopsewee. Now that I’ve seen your pictures, we’ll put it on the list of things to do this summer. Thanks! And Happy Valentine’s Day!

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Ally Bean says:

    I adore going to places like this one. I appreciate the idea that it’s been preserved rather than restored, which are two entirely different approaches to history. Thanks for sharing the photos. It looks lovely.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Murphy's Law says:

    The Hopsewee Plantation is magnificent. I love the back entrance as much as the front on the home. You even caught the painters hard at work!! Can’t help being curious what it looks like inside, and the stories it could tell. Those camellias are just beautiful. What a neat idea, to preserve rather than restore.

    The Tea Room looks so inviting. I really like the brickwork entrance and stone path. Love how the door and windows match.

    Gorgeous sunset. Sounds like you had and all around nice day.

    Happy Valentine’s Day my friend. ❤️🌹💝
    🐾Ginger 🐾

    Liked by 1 person

    • Happy Valentine’s Day to you as well! It really was quite a lovely layout, and I can only assume it is more beautiful when those live oaks have leaves. I kept looking at that smoke house and thinking ‘potting shed.’ 🙂 No smiles though when I looked in the slaves quarters – central chimney, one fireplace on each side, one room on each side. A serious reminder of how some of these large plantations really functioned. Yes, the painters were hard at work painting the shutters. This entire area is ‘under construction’ this time of year trying to get all the work done before the ‘season’ starts the first of April.

      Like

  4. Dan Antion says:

    I am glad they have put the effort in over time to preserve this beautiful place. I love the photos, especially that sunset. The front of that main building looks so inviting. IT’s kind of sad to think of the history, but there’s something about those big porches.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Those porches tell a tale don’t they about how people lived in those days. Yes, the history is definitely sad, and I debated about even including a couple of those sentences. But, the reality is it is our history which is a fact, and hopefully we have learned from it. Anyone who is a skilled carpenter like yourself or even an average diy person like me could look around there and truly appreciate the longevity of those buildings and applaud the craftsmen who built them.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Dan Antion says:

        Agreed. This is our history. This is about as good a story as we get around this subject. I think we have an obligation to tell these stories. This was a nice post to read and look at. Well done!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Beautiful, beautiful sunset. Glad the freed slaves took over the plantation. Words can hardly describe how I feel about slavery and the ugly, brutal racism that continues to do this day.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Joyce says:

    Breathtaking sunset! What a contrast to the blankness of white we’re in the midst of here – and back home in NH for you, I’m sure!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I’m glad the enslaved African-Americans took over the plantation. Did they ever get ownership of it, though? It would be ‘right and meet so to do’.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Almost Iowa says:

    Beautiful place, sad history – but then so much of history is beautiful and sad.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Eliza Waters says:

    Happy Valentine’s Day, Judy! Sounds like a delightful outing and what a fine grand finale in that sunset.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I have such mixed feelings when seeing or touring these properties. One cannot deny the beauty of the home, but the ugliness of its history casts a pall over it. No denying the beauty of hat sunset, though!

    Liked by 1 person

    • There are historic areas here in the southern states that played important parts in our nation’s history. I view it as not only a beautiful property with historic buildings but as a teaching/learning moment. It’s our history, that can’t be changed. But, we can learn from it and do better. I felt the same way at Gettysburg, the many American Cemeteries in Europe, and the other historic sites I’ve been to. I never leave the same as when I arrived.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Now noted in my list of places to see! That looks like a really nice place to visit. South Carolina has so many amazing, historical things to see. – Marty

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Oddment says:

    “Stories to tell.” I’m quoting you from your comment above. That’s it exactly. We can’t re-write the story, but we can learn from it, as you say. I admit I laughed when I read that you looked at the smokehouse and thought “potting shed.” Gardeners just can’t stop gardening, no matter what they’re doing!

    Liked by 1 person

    • The South has a lot of historical stories, and I guess I try to learn something from each of them. Tomorrow, I’m going to listen to a young African American historian tell a story from the view of some slaves. I always go home more educated than when I came. Yes, I guess we can’t stop thinking about gardening potentials. 🙂 There was a lot of landscaping going on, but that could have been a post by itself. Pots of trees and plants sitting all around in groupings. My pulse quickened. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  13. joey says:

    That is beautiful, all of it, home, camellias, shed, deck. All of it. What a pleasant way to spend the day!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Oooo, you’re in your warm happy place. Hurrah!! Thanks for sharing and enjoy, enjoy, enjoy!

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

  15. This looks like a fabulous outing.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. germac4 says:

    A very interesting post on South Carolina history, and it seems a really good idea to preserve rather than restore. Glad you were able to enjoy a good lunch with friends…. and take that amazing photo of the sunset …. Absolutely stunning. 😀👏

    Liked by 1 person

  17. KerryCan says:

    Mmmmm–you had me at “shrimp and grits”! This sounds like a wonderful outing–and the doors are impressive! That last photo of the beach–SO inviting!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. What a beautiful place and the camellias and live oaks are just gorgeous. I like the idea of the plantation being preserved and not restored. Thanks for sharing your outing!

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Hi Judy! Long time no blog for me… Ilex – Midwesternplantgirl =-) I’m back, new ID 😉 Gotta get to refollowing everyone.
    Hope you have been well!

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Norm 2.0 says:

    Looks like a gorgeous spot despite the history 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  21. We visited one of the plantations near Charleston, but not this one. Beautiful place with some grim history.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Joanne Sisco says:

    As I look out the window here at the thick blanket of snow and then I look through your photos, you can guess which location I would prefer to be in right now 😉
    There’s just a wee bit of difference between the main house and the slave quarters. Sigh. As Norm said, it’s very pretty even if its history isn’t.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. I love that great big oak I think with all the moss draping off its limbs. The house looks charming and I’m happy to see it’s getting some TLC. Your day sounds perfect and that sunset was amazing! I bet it was glorious in person.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. It must have been exciting to arrive and see that grand façade.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Nancy says:

    Spectacular captures and the doors are marvelous. The history in the South is something we have to learn from so that we can do better in the future.
    Glad you had a wonderful time at your tea and the ending with a gorgeous sunset… fabulous!

    Liked by 1 person

  26. treadway says:

    I would love to see this place for myself…

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Annie says:

    Thank goodness this plantation was preserved as so many were lost to history…. and especially the slave quarters. I would suspect there aren’t too many of those left today.

    Liked by 1 person

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