Fall gardening

Gardening in September is considerably different than summer or spring. It’s house cleaning time – divide, move, rearrange, and clean. I can’t say it’s near as much fun, but I keep thinking about what I do this month I won’t have to do in April.

We’ve seen a lot more Monarchs than the past three or four years. It has been fun watching them, but I usually only have my phone with me, and the photos are nothing to shout about. I have a MG friend who has been watching and using a good camera, so here are two nice shots from her garden.

I pulled out our veggie garden since we’re headed out of town. When I grabbed one batch of carrots, I saw this fluffy yellow thing on the greens.

I wouldn’t have had any idea what it could possibly be, but I’d just read a post from the Laidback Gardener soΒ I’m thinking it is a kind of gall.

Or, Eliza Waters commented that it may be a spiders’ nest. When I looked it up, I’m thinking she is probably right.

Some people wonder why we read blogs. This is why – we learn from each other. πŸ™‚

What did I learn at the Great Bay and Pruning workshops? The number one issue with the Great Bay is the number of people using fertilizer close to the water, and the fact that the water swishes back and for and takes 18 days to actually refresh.

The pruning take away was that you get to choose whether to prune according to the natural shape of the plant/shrub/tree or the shape you prefer for the space it occupies in your garden. When you do prune, always pick the right time of year or you’ll get a flush of new growth right as you go into winter.

I’m working on a new MG project, and we need plants. We can, of course, buy them, but I thought why not ask one of the MGs who has an acre garden with a vast assortment. Yes, I could dig, so with shovel and buckets, I dug. I soaked them overnight in water and fish emulsion, divided them the next morning, and potted them up. We now have an assortment of 47 plants for installation on October 1. Sharing is a good thing.

We’re headed to the northwest this week so I’ll try and check in with everyone, but I’ll be using a new iPad which I’m finding challenging. If you have any suggestions on how to adjust to an iPad, feel free to let me know. I’ve used tablets for years, but never used anything as a substitute for my laptop. After installing five email accounts and finding two had merged, I really needed a cold one. πŸ™‚

Have a great week. 🍁

About NewEnglandGardenAndThread

Master Gardener who enjoys gardening, quilting, photography, and traveling.
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69 Responses to Fall gardening

  1. Ah, the joy of technology! Good luck with your new tablet. Wow, dividing and potting all those plants sounds like a lot of work! I have some plants that could use dividing but it’s too early here. I think all the monarchs are up north this year. I’ve only seen a few in my garden.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Dan Antion says:

    Sounds like a lot of good gardening. The butterflies are beautiful. I get so many of my pictures with my phone, it’s a little sad. Your trip to the northwest sounds interesting. I look forward to hearing about that and seeing some pictures from that part of the country.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I must have taken 20 photos of a Monarch yesterday with my phone, and when I tried to crop a little they just didn’t look sharp anymore. So, I borrowed. πŸ™‚ It’s been several years since we visited family there, so we’re looking forward to seeing them and how things are changing in their part of the world.

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  3. Murphy's Law says:

    Noticing more Monarchs here as well. Love watching them. Almost done with the fall gardening cleanup, but like housework, there’s always something else to be done!

    That’s a very interesting fact about fertilizer close to a water source. Thanks for passing it on.

    Good luck with the iPad. I’m sure you’ll get it figured out.

    Have a safe trip and a fabulous time!!

    🐾Ginger 🐾

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I have seen so many interesting creatures in my gardens this year and my food was so yummy. All was great except for the 50 hornworms in one day that wiped out one batch of Tomatoes.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Brenda says:

    It was the year of the monarch, that’s for sure. I wish I had you hear to advise me on dividing perennials. I’m always a bit hesitant to get in there and chop things up, but mine seem to be growing at a ridiculous pace and divide I must. Have a wonderful trip–it’s a lovely time of year to visit there.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I love dividing perennials so I wish I could help. I find two ways that work for me: dig the plant up or just dig/cut off a section with a sharp tool. Then I always put it in a bucket of water and let it sit for a few hours or overnight. When you take it out, it is ‘usually’ easier to pull apart into smaller pieces. If not, I have a small saw/knife tool, look it over, and try to make cuts where it looks logical. I even do that with some bushes I have. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Ally Bean says:

    The butterfly photo is stunning. And thanks for the info about pruning bushes. Been thinking on that topic lately.

    I used to have an iPad and eventually decided it was merely a way to consume movies and tv shows– or to get directions and use maps. I found it difficult for anything that involved creating content or responding to email/comments. I hope your newer model isn’t like my old one, but that was my experience. 😐

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Judy, monarchs are hard to capture even with a good camera.Your friend did a very nice job. I picked up a packet of blue bonnet seeds when we were in Texas and am going to get them started in about three weeks. I have no idea what I am doing, and will probably be asking for advice (if they even come up) on the next step. Wish me luck! I have no experience with an iPad, hubby has one, but I’ve never used it. Still travel with my lap top. Have fun on your trip.

    Liked by 1 person

    • If you can find a small planting kit that has the base tray with individual compartments for the seed starter mix and then has the clear plastic cover, that will help get the seeds to germinate. Once they germinate and get four leaves, you move them to compartments with potting mix which will hold more moisture. You can take a pencil or something similar, make a hole, gently wiggle/pull the seedling out, put it in the hole, cover up the roots, and it’s on its way. You may need to move it to a larger container one more time before planting outside, but it’s a pretty interesting process. πŸ™‚

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  8. Eliza Waters says:

    I’m wondering if the blob on your carrots was a spider nest? They can look like that.
    Have a great trip to the PNW, a good time of year to visit. Hope you have good weather!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Joyce says:

    Well, I’d need “a cold one” πŸ™‚ – in the form of Chardonnay! – if finding solutions to fall gardening problems were my responsibility! As I read, I realized that it’s knowledge, experience, and skill that separate you pros from the rest of the world – we who’d starve in a day if pruning timing and pest and pollution control weren’t practiced and shared between those of you who feed the world! Even on a small family-sized scale, you personally contribute to the exchange of ideas and encouragement that benefit the rest of us. Thank you!
    And welcome back, butterflies!

    Liked by 1 person

    • This has been a tough growing season and everyone has a story to tell about their garden and the challenges they had to work through. I do like learning and must admit I sat there listening to the facts about the Great Bay and probably had my mouth hanging open because who knew that it took 18 days for the water to change out. I thought it came in and went out – not so much. I hope the butterflies who visited NH know how much their visits were appreciated because we missed them for several years. πŸ™‚

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  10. Here, in southern Vermont, I’ve seen more monarchs and other butterflies than I have for the past five or six years. I find this encouraging, with caution of course!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Sharing is indeed a good thing! Yay! And bon voyage.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Fish emulsion? What does it do?

    Liked by 1 person

  13. pbmgarden says:

    Great photos of the monarchs. Safe travels.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Oddment says:

    I fear I cannot be helpful with either the yellow fuzzy thing or the iPad, but I can wave adieu with the best of ’em. (Can you see me waving my Hoosier bandanner?) I hope you have a grand time.

    Lovely butterfly and caterpillar photos! And I very much agree about learning from other bloggers. True continuing education!

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Ogee says:

    Sharing IS good!! Great job on the transplants! Enjoy your trip. With all your chores done, you have earned it!

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Beautiful photos, even if I now think the spider’s nest is a bit creepy. It’s not even Halloween yet! πŸ˜‰ It took me awhile to get used to the iPad, but I absolutely love it. I can’t create WordPress posts on it (still prefer my laptop), but I do use it for reading others’ posts. – Marty

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  17. Annie says:

    Finally convinced our association not to fertilize or use pesticides on the lawns. Good luck with your iPad. I bought a new one, too, to replace an ancient one and there is a learning curve. Have a good trip.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Eilene Lyon says:

    I appreciate the tips on dividing perennials. I really need to do some of that this fall.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Lovely butterfly photos. Judy, one year you need to come and visit me in September. My city is known as the Garden City and we have a beautiful Carnival of Flowers in September. The gardens are stunning.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Joanne Sisco says:

    I keep looking at my garden and wishing someone would take care of it for me. So far, no luck 😏

    I did learn something new though from this post – soaking a plant’s root ball in water before replanting. I’m assuming this helps breakup the root ball a bit?
    I didn’t realize I should be starting some of these activities now – although given the unseasonably cool weather, I guess it’s a good idea. You-know-what is coming …

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Nancy says:

    I love my iPad… I pretty much do all my blogging with it. So good luck and a cold one always helps!

    The monarchs have been happier as of late …thanks to so many planting gardens for them and communities who are more aware!

    I too have been dividing and trimming back here at the LakeHouse!

    We head to the NorthWest in Mid October… look forward to hearing about your trip!

    Liked by 1 person

  22. ragnarsbhut says:

    Judy, what are some of your favorite things to grow in your garden?

    Liked by 1 person

    • How long do you have? πŸ™‚ I truly love Bleeding Hearts, Dwarf Korean Lilacs, every type of Hydrangea available, Sedums, and for annuals I need to have Mexican Sunflowers for the pollinators. I could make this list a lot longer, but I might put you to sleep. πŸ™‚

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  23. ragnarsbhut says:

    Judy, the answer can be as lengthy as you want. Do you like to grow peppers in your garden? Do you enjoy hot sauce at all?

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’ve grown green and red peppers but not hot peppers. Peppers and tomatoes like our stock tank raised beds because their feet stay warm all summer from the metal. I’ve also put hoops with plastic on the tanks in the spring to get them up and growing sooner. I wish you good luck with your hot peppers and all the good recipes. πŸ™‚

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  24. ragnarsbhut says:

    Judy, I will keep my blog updated as often as is possible.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. KerryCan says:

    The butterflies have been incredible this year. It’s killing me, though, to drive my car–I have hit so many (or they’ve flown into the grill). Breaks my heart! I’m completely overwhelmed with fall gardening chores . . . .

    Liked by 1 person

  26. joey says:

    Our local reservoir is essentially ruined by pesticides and fertilizer and herbicide being used to make fake pretty and nice instead of actual lake living. And I never tire of complaining about it.
    Sorry.
    Anyway, beautiful photos πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  27. I look forward to hearing about the new MG project!

    Like

  28. Karen says:

    I’m sure your new project will be a sucess. Have and great time on your trip and good luck with your iPad, I wanted one for our trip but my husband convinced me to go with a new MacBook instead. It was what I was used to and he didn’t think I should take something that uses a new system along on our trip. I’m glad I listened. 😊

    Liked by 1 person

  29. I put out the feeders today because at least there will be one place the birds and squirrels can eat and not be poisoned!

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Dawn says:

    We most definitely read your blog to learn new things, Judy! Thank you for the important reminder about the timing of our pruning tasks. I’m looking forward to a whole day in the garden tomorrow! Lots to keep me busy as I try to catch up on a few garden projects! Over the past two weeks, I’m seeing more Monarchs here in the Midwest, too. Such a wonderful thing!
    Can’t wait to learn more about your latest MG project, Judy! You have amazing energy!
    Wishing you a lovely start to Autumn! πŸ’—

    Liked by 1 person

  31. tonytomeo says:

    You know, I lived in Monarch Grove, which was famous for the swarming monarch butterflies who migrated through. Minor warms of them migrate though the Santa Clara Valley too. Yet, I have never seen their caterpillars.

    Liked by 1 person

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