What day is it?

Day 8 of our staying at home.

Have I kept busy, yes, and I’m probably doing the same stuff you are doing. The closets are organized, all my fabric is color coded, masks have been sewn for grocery shopping, the attic looks the best it ever has, and we’ve shredded every old document. 🙂

So, what’s left to talk about except emotions.

The #1 thing that absolutely sends my blood pressure skyrocketing are the college kids on the beach ignoring recommendations for social distancing. Every one of us who have abided by state directives will now be asked to stay home longer because of their contracting it which has already started.

Will we learn from this experience?

  • Be willing to pay a higher price for items to be produced in the US where we could have ready access to the supply chain?
  • The environment is getting a break from all of our vehicles parked, but will that be a positive or a negative with current climate change. We’ll see.
  • Will we all have a few extra rolls of TP just in case?
  • After being told repeatedly that we’ll all expire if we don’t eat organic, we’re now reminded that we could expire if we don’t have some high sodium packaged and canned foods on the shelf.
  • The realization that the food we eat is not produced by the grocery store but by a farmer, and s/he needs our native pollinators so stop using so many chemicals on your lawn just to make it green and weed free.
  • The importance of over-the-road truckers and the role they play in our daily lives.
  • Saying thank you to all the people working in our grocery stores.
  • Veggie seeds are something we might want to have on hand especially since Johnny’s and Burpee are sold out of many. Can you say a lot of victory gardens in 2020?
  • That rainy day fund everyone was suppose to set aside wasn’t just idle talk.
  • Will brick and mortar stores survive after we all learn to shop online?
  • Washing our hands with soap and water really was something we should have been doing all along.

I’m also grateful for…

  • All the people who have pulled together and stayed home to try and bring a halt to this issue.
  • The generous folks checking in on seniors who do not have family, and neighbors helping neighbors.
  • Access to grocery stores for items I need even if some I want are not available.
  • Enough food for three meals a day.
  • The option to read, sew and garden.
  • The blogging community that allows us all to stay in touch and keep a small piece of our normal life.
  • Faith that we will be able to weather this storm, regroup, and learn to live again.

Sending each and every one of you best wishes for a safe week. ❤️Your plans for this week?

About NewEnglandGardenAndThread

Master Gardener who enjoys gardening, quilting, photography, and traveling.
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89 Responses to What day is it?

  1. Lorilin says:

    We’re laying low too. Good luck this week. 💕

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Angela says:

    So well said, and a wonderful point about the victory garden. Please stay well!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Sheree says:

    Well said and we’re on day 9 of lockdown in France but life goes on albeit in our own little bubble.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Amen to everything you said! Don’t get me started on the spring breakers. The officials here closed the beach, even to locals, after a crowd of spring breakers decided to all come to the beach at the same time. I’d also like to add a thank you to the restaurants who are open for take out and to their workers. What am I doing today? Taking our tax information to the accountant!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Dan Antion says:

    All best wishes back to you, Judy. You highlighted some very important things. Maybe some good will come out of this. We are not only all in this together, but we are all in this complex ecosystem together – time to take care of it.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Oddment says:

    Wonderful post! Thank you! Today is Day 11 for me: I’ve gone nowhere except to the mailbox in front. Sleep is elusive and so is patience. Yesterday we had snow and hail and rain. The days ahead and the days behind are a continuum of darkness. I’m up to HERE with the flim-flam. But I am well aware of the amazing first responders, our doctors, and nurses and others in the medical profession who take risks for us. I’m in awe of the knowledge and expertise of medical specialists who have devoted their skills to the public good. I know that they are the ones who have real reason to gripe, and their gripes are for their patients. I know others are out there, too, delivering, cleaning, and helping in other ways. I’m trying to take lessons from them. And from thoughtful blog posts like this. Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I was so caught up trying to be factual and not my snarky self, I forgot first responders. Thank you sincerely for the reminder. We run away, and they run towards – heroes every time we need them. I hope we can retain the hard lessons we are learning from this situation because I think we could be better prepared moving forward and that includes seeing through the flim-flam. ❤️

      Liked by 1 person

      • Oddment says:

        No. I disagree. You put your reader in mind of the good and the constructive. You pushed us in the direction of thinking about those kinds of people. I am hoping hard that the history books put this flim-flam where it belongs — in the shadow of the good.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. And shame on that governor of Florida who initially refused to close the beaches. The kids are young and silly and thoughtless. What’s the governor’s excuse? I guess “even duct tape can’t fix stupid” surely applies to him. Great lists you made. Yes, yes, and yes!

    Liked by 4 people

  8. John Hric says:

    I have been trying to avoid cleaning closets and such. Though that effort has been futile/feudal. She who must be obeyed has won. Something about getting things in order before gardening season starts. And now that the spread sheet of seeds is sorted the goal this week is to sort the envelopes of daylily seeds into a similar order in anticipation of planting time. Somebody wake up auntie shrew !

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Murphy's Law says:

    Our grocery store, like so many, is offering seniors and anyone with compromised immune systems or serious health issues, to shop from 6am-7am, seven days a week. We needed to replenish some items so we took advantage of that Sunday. Every employee I came upon I stopped to thank them, and ShopRite, for giving us this opportunity. It’s a big deal to us. Every one of them was flabbergasted that I was thanking them. No one else has. What a sad commentary on us. 😢

    I’ll spare you my rampage on the beach goers and the party hearty groups. I will simply say, “$”0&/?|#]!+<@!¥£]\" I think that about covers it!! 🤗

    I wholeheartedly agree with everything you said. We are doing all we can to be part of the solution, and not the problem. I thought today, just to mix it up a little, I might contemplate my navel! Lol.

    Stay well and be safe my friend.
    🐾Ginger 🐾

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you for the laugh because I sincerely enjoyed it. 🙂 We too are going to take advantage of an early morning shopping trip for seniors, and I will do the same because they really do deserve our appreciation. I don’t think any of us spent much time thinking the person checking and bagging our groceries would be ‘first responders’ in a situation like this. Stay safe and maintain your sense of humor because we can all enjoy a good laugh. ❤️

      Like

  10. P.S. Thought you would appreciate this from CNN: “In Italy – where a staggering 1,440 deaths were announced over the weekend — one exasperated local mayor had this to say to those violating quarantine: ‘Look, this isn’t a movie. You are not Will Smith in I Am Legend. Go home.'”

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think they are use to thinking life is a video game and someone gets killed off, they restart, and the person is back for round two. Hate to disillusion them, but real life doesn’t work that way, and in this case, we are all going to pay the price. ❤️

      Like

  11. A friend lives in Clearwater, FL where those kids on the beach were recorded making their obnoxious comments to a national audience. Like most of us, she was appalled with the kids, but also with her local officials. The beach was shut down the next day – too little, too late. Same with boaters in Miami gathering on the local sandbar – shut down after news reports. Sad our county officials have to be shamed into doing the right thing. Responsible actions could have prevented the spread. Our local news station took a FB poll of citizens to see if they would support our Governor imposing a shutdown of the entire state. Overwhelmingly people said yes. He is leaving that decision to administrators county by county. Obviously it isn’t working.

    On a brighter note, my brother sent photos of his garden yesterday. He has lettuce, potatoes, peppers,onions, tomatoes and cucumbers growing in individual raised beds that he built with recycled materials. That made me smile.

    I too am grateful for many things and not terribly inconvenienced by any of this except for the lack of social interaction. I spend more time on the phone, in actual conversation,(vs. text messaging) than I have in ages. That’s definitely a positive outcome. Take care.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Our state like FL has a big tourism industry, but tough decisions need to be made to correct the curve of this virus. It would be good to think these choices would be made quickly. Applause to your brother, and I hope he has a huge harvest of fresh veggies to enjoy. I’m starting my seeds tomorrow. Phone calls, hmm, I seem to remember them. You take care too. ❤️

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Great post. It is hard to get people to follow orders. Somehow we think it’s our right to do what we want regardless of impact. We are in day 7 although I see people still visiting our neighbors. He’s a doctor but I’m not sure he understands was sheltering in place means. I stear clear of them.

    Liked by 1 person

    • We all appreciate and enjoy our individual rights, but when people are suffering all around the globe, in the US, in every state, and in our town, it is hard to fathom how they can’t comply. This is when I have to keep the faith and appreciate all those who are making the sacrifice otherwise anger sets in, and that doesn’t make me feel any better. Hope the week goes well and you stay safe. ❤️

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Joyce says:

    I share your frustration (and that of Laurie – above comment) on those with no respect for distancing, as well as officials too timid to just shut the places down. We’ve been inside for what seems like weeks and I am glad to do this to keep myself and others safe. Two local daughters take our list when they shop so we have enough of everything. Even so, I long for the return of normalcy so I can choose my own fresh fruit and veggies.

    Liked by 1 person

    • A big round of applause to your daughters for taking good care of you and their Dad. Yes, who knew picking your own groceries out would be such a luxury. Stay safe, friend, and we’ll be able to talk about your beautiful window boxes before long. ❤️

      Like

  14. I sincerely hope that after all of this is but a gloomy memory, we will learn and more people will take some of the common sense measures routinely, like staying home from work if you’re sick! And employers will once again offer sick pay. I know I’m being overly optimistic here, but I can dream.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. nutsfortreasure says:

    Keeping busy inside as weather dictates and outside from 37 degrees or warmer. Feels good to get away from news and Facebook where I see so much others should be ashamed of 😦 sharing evil perpetuates it We have all our hard work complete before black flies 🙂 Take care of yourself.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Ally Bean says:

    I agree about all you’ve said, of course. I will admit that I’m extra pleased to be part of the blogging community at this point in time. Without the interactions in the blogging comment sections I’d feel isolated. Grateful, you betcha.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. I’m glad you mentioned thanking grocery store workers. Honestly, they all deserve bonuses both during and after this is all over. As a Floridian, I too felt anger at the spring break crowds who flaunted the rules and acted as if none of this was important or critical. Their actions endanger all of society.

    But as a northern Floridian, I can also say that not all beaches (and communities) are alike. Though they did close beaches in nearby Duval County (Jacksonville), all are still open where I live (St. Augustine), plus those just to the south of us because they run on for miles on end. They are suitable for families and older people who actually follow the rules. A one-size-fits-all, blanket beach-closure policy is not necessary; but staying in small groups and keeping distance from other is. As the governor of New York correctly told his citizens, absolutely go to parks, walking, etc., just do it responsibly. Great post, Judy. – Marty

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Norm 2.0 says:

    I’ve already got all of the seeds I wanted to plant for this year 😉
    I recently started some of my seedlings which is helping to keep me amused and distracted for at least a few minutes a day.
    Thanks for focusing on some of the positive stuff to come out of this mess. We’ve all heard how selfishly some have been behaving, but I appreciate hearing more about the good stuff. We’re going to be in this for a long haul I’m afraid, so every bit of good news helps.
    Stay safe 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Watching something grow is always a plus. I have to say I was shocked thought when I looked on Johnny’s and Burpees to see all the ‘out of stock’ notices. I made some substitutes so we’ll be trying something new which is always good. Stay safe, Norm. If you need a mask, let me know, I’ll make you one. I have the pattern down. Maybe I can find some fabric that has a door on it. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  19. I love your list of things we might all learn from this, and we do all have so many people to thank for all they are doing x Stay safe and well yourself

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Eliza Waters says:

    Good to see your post, Judy. It’s nice to know that we aren’t alone and the blogging community is a good bunch to share this crisis, IMO. While my life isn’t hugely different as I no longer work, I do miss my yoga pals and walking buddies.
    Your list of chores done is impressive! I’m being even more lazy these days, if that is even possible, lol! Take care!

    Liked by 1 person

  21. holly says:

    I’m on day 8 too! Stay safe and thanks for such a great read😊💖

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Difficult times indeed. Here in the UK we are in the same situation and as I am in a very high risk category we are self-isolated. Our garden is helping us cope though.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I have family members at high risk as well, so we are staying in as this progresses. I can imagine your joy at working in your garden. I’m sorry to say we had several inches of snow last night so the entire landscape is buried under several inches of white. Stay safe. ❤️

      Like

  23. And thanks to the first responders and health workers who put themselves at risk to help others.

    Mr ET went to the plant nursery to buy his usual collection of winter vegie seedlings only to be told they had completely sold out. I wonder if the people who’ve suddenly decided to grow their own actually realise that they won’t be harvesting anything for several weeks. Mr ET bought packets of seeds elsewhere, then went back to the nursery in the afternoon to get seed raising mix and the delivery truck was just unloading a new delivery of seedlings so he was able to get some after all.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I really was shocked at how many seeds were sold out when I went online. I normally buy new seeds each year, but it makes you think about taking better care of the seeds you have left in case you need them the following season. Wishing you and Mr ET good gardening and stay safe. ❤️

      Like

  24. Nancy says:

    We are hunkered down as well. And I too went crazy over the spring break kids on the beaches! And the higher ups(government) let it happen. Grrrr….!

    We are lucky to be in a warm weather state and have areas to walk where no one is and a big back yard to tend to.

    And yes… drawers are cleaned but I have learned a new hobby. I have learned how to polish rocks to make them all shiny and purdy!

    Stay safe my dear friend!

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Ooh, now there’s a hobby I haven’t thought of. Hope you post some photos. Stay safe. ❤️

    Like

  26. germac4 says:

    Hi Judy, what a great post, I like the way you listed things, good and bad that are happening…and it is really interesting to see how other countries are managing this crisis. Australia’s biggest and most popular city Sydney, is a ”hotspot’ for the virus, hard to get people off beaches (what are they thinking??) and a cruise ship recently allowed into Sydney harbour has brought more cases.
    I really enjoy having blogging friends to ”touch base with” during this time.
    I have to go, the kookaburras are singing their dawn chorus…wish I could pass it on..

    Liked by 1 person

    • Some folks have pets, and you have those amazing birds that provide such great photography opportunities and enjoyment. Appreciate every dawn chorus because the reality of life around the world is quite challenging as you well know. You have Sydney and we have New York City. The numbers are staggering. Stay safe. ❤️

      Liked by 1 person

  27. joey says:

    A special shout out for mentioning the weed killer!
    I was so insanely mad at spring breakers on my tv I wanted to shake them all silly!
    My only focus right now is to get well 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  28. I love the perspective of your two lists. I am also thankful that I live in a place where empty grocery shelves are a shock and an inconvenience. When I first saw a nearly empty store, my first thought was, “For some people this is a routine experience.”

    Thank goodness it’s nearly spring. I can survive anything if I get a bit of sunshine and fresh air.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. You have written such wise words! Times of crisis always brings out the best and worst in people, don’t they? I don’t understand those who ignore requests to isolate. I remember feeling invincible when I was young, but I also followed (most 🙂 ) orders, especially when they were in the best interests of society at whole. I sure hope the items on the what we can learn list come true. So many lessons to be learned if we can only open our eyes and ears. Thank you for a great post.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It would be terrible to not learn from this wouldn’t it? I read one blogger refer to it as ‘living history,’ and I hope there are many documented lessons so future generations do not have to approach something like this so flat footed. I think we all thought life was too civilized to be brought to our needs by a virus, but we’ve learned a hard lesson that will have long lasting effects on every part of our life as we have known. Stay safe. ❤️

      Liked by 1 person

  30. Joanne Sisco says:

    Both of your lists hit the mark.

    The stories about those who have not respected the call to “distance and isolate” frustrate me. This is just extending the period that this dangerous virus spreads. I know it is only a matter of time before our PM orders a lockdown … and it won’t be from a lack of effort to get people to voluntarily stay home. There are just those who blatantly refuse to believe they are a problem.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, it is hard to not be angry about those that have avoided the self isolation which is now causing exploding cases and extending confinement for the rest of us. I read a college student who had gone on spring break and returned with the virus said, the government should have told us how serious it was. Really? On the other side of the coin, thank you to you and everyone else who has heeded the call and is helping to keep the curve from rising. ❤️

      Like

      • Joanne Sisco says:

        I think that a lot of people don’t follow the news … and based on a few recent experiences, I’m starting to think many of them can’t read either – ie notices in the grocery store about maintaining a 6-foot distance.
        Yesterday, in spite of the signs and tape on the floor at the cash register, a man pulled up right behind me. When I asked him to backup, I got a look that clearly said ‘well, aren’t you a princess’ 🙄

        Liked by 1 person

      • I’m with you with the ‘can’t read’ thought. We drove around town today after recycling and dropping off mail just to get out of the house and decided to do a fast food drive through for lunch. There is a huge sign that normally has some special on it, but today it said ‘drive through open.’ We went through the drive through, sat in our car with everyone else and ate our lunch while watching the people in the drive through. We saw three different groups walk up to the door where there were additional signs, and give the door a pull and almost take a face plant before they stopped to read the sign again. It was like a Candid Camera moment. Must admit from the safety of our vehicle, it was pretty funny. 🙂

        Like

      • Joanne Sisco says:

        hahaha!! Cheap entertainment! 🤣

        Liked by 1 person

  31. Brenda says:

    I hope some good comes out of this. It is likely to be a sort of crucible, where our lives, our communities, and our society will be forever changed in ways we don’t yet anticipate. On one level, it’s fascinating to watch human behavior–such a spectrum from self-interest and complete disregard for others to amazing selflessness and community support. On the other hand, waiting for all of the heartbreak, dislocation, and shattered dreams that this will bring is almost overwhelming.

    Today I’ll be taking fabric off the loom for a jacket that I’ll be sewing. It’s wool that I spun from one fleece, belonging to a sheep named “Chops,” an apt name–he’s no longer with us. It was a lovely spin–lustrous and soft and I like to think of him living on through his wool. And throughout the day, along with a background of worry, I’ll be listening to the drip, drip of snow melt. Hoping it will be gone by tomorrow.
    Take care.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Truly, this has been a roller coaster of emotions as we watch this evolve and human reaction. There have been stories of very caring individuals and then some real ugly ones. I’m with you, I hope we can learn from it. Your project sounds wonderful with good memories woven into each part of the project. Yes, drip, drip. The sun is shining here today and some of the grass is peaking through the snow. Stay safe, friend. ❤️

      Liked by 1 person

  32. tonytomeo says:

    I am told that the sky over Los Angeles is bluer than anyone can remember it ever being, with the snow on the mountains clearly visible in the background. I would like to see what San Jose looks like, but have not excuse to go over there.

    Liked by 1 person

  33. I just love how you’re able to put your feelings into words, Judy! I have a very hard time with that.
    I agree with everything you said, and the things on your lists!

    The weather has been snowy and rainy so I’d have been indoors most the week anyway, but we’re laying low. My circle of contacts since the 14th has been less than 10. I’m trying to walk up to the mailbox or hike along a trail when there have been breaks in the weather, and I’m avoiding anyone I see while doing it. We chat quickly from across the road or trail. 😊

    I want to make some masks but gave away all my cotton fabric when I was clearing out the old house to move here. I hung on to it forever thinking it would come in handy one day, and don’t you know it came to pass and I got rid of it!

    I’ll have to order some fabric and notions, and dig out my machine and make some. If this passes in a few weeks by the time the material and notions arrive and get them made I can store those with my other emergency supplies. Now, where did I put my sewing machine? It’s here somewhere!

    I hope you stay well!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I haven’t been around other people for 13 days except for those I pass at the grocery store once a week. After retiring, I basically stopped talking on the phone because I was so tired of conference calls and answering a ringing phone. But, I find I have to make myself place a call to a friend and talk and laugh for a few minutes because it is like a good shot in the arm. I know you can find that sewing machine, plus you could use an old cotton shirt for the outside material and an old cotton t-shirt for the inside material. Two pieces, right sides together, sew, turn, make two pleats, top stitch. For the elastic you might have to be creative or make ties. I saw one mask attached to a ball cap with a button. You can do this without ordering anything, but you do need to find the sewing machine!. Stay safe. ❤️

      Liked by 1 person

      • My mom who usually stays home except for going to church, her book club, her walk and shopping said she’s going bonkers not being able to get out and go where ever, when ever she wants to. She’s knows it’s a psychological thing but it’s powerful.

        Thanks for the tips about using an old shirt or two. I found my sewing machine buried under my camping gear. That was step one. 😀

        Liked by 1 person

  34. Excellent questions and observations. Thank you, Judy.

    Liked by 1 person

  35. Karen says:

    Our county (17,000) here in Florida didn’t have any cases a week ago but now we have 24. Officials closed our beaches because of spring breakers from up north but people are still using them. New Yorkers are coming here like crazy and the first thing they do is head to the grocery store. When I am running low on something, I’m ordering on line from Publix. I’m getting my first order of fresh veggies tomorrow after a 5 day wait. Stay smart, stay safe and stay healthy.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m not sure what people don’t understand about ‘stay at home’ but it has sure been an eye opener. Applause to FL, RI and a few other states that are meeting the issue head on. That’s great that you can get fresh produce on line. Hannaford was offering ordering on line, but they were so overwhelmed they had to stop it. Good luck to you and hubby as well. Staying in is the best policy right now.

      Liked by 1 person

  36. jkitt750 says:

    My method of maintaining my sanity is gardening. It is productive. It requires my attention. I enjoy the work. I would be gardening anyway if this pandemic had not happened but it would not have had the same impact on my mental wellbeing as it does these days. I hope you can find productive, safe and enjoyable pursuits to occupy you mind.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Gardening makes sense and is definitely good for the body and the soul. I stopped at our local nursery yesterday, mask on. As I was approaching, a lady was leaving, but I was the only customer in the store. They had a procedure for putting my purchase down, stepping back to a line, then stepping forward to lay my card down, stepping back, not signing the receipt, then she stepped back, and I stepped forward to pick up my package. I walked away with my seeds potatoes which was the goal, but it sure wasn’t the normal experience. Stay safe and garden on at least as much as you can with the rain. 🙂

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