Expiration date

I grew up poor in the city, my husband grew up poor in the country, we both had part-time jobs at a young age, but neither one of us walked up hill both ways to school. πŸ™‚

As adults, it has served us well. We’re both resourceful because of it, but sometimes things just can’t be cost effectively fixed.

Last week, I used my serger with some old jeans fabric, and the thickness kicked the foot and bent the shaft it was attached to. I emailed the manufacturer, looked up how far an authorized dealer was, googled, checked YouTube, and on Saturday, I dropped it in the electronics box at recycling.

It was a week of reality, since our DR Trimmer didn’t come home from the repair shop either. The estimate was over half the price of a new one, and there are other parts ready to go.

We aren’t complaining because the serger was 10 years old, and the DR Trimmer was 25+.

Of course, it does make me wonder if I’m closing in on my expiration date. Hmm. πŸ™‚

White I contemplate that, I can’t leave without a couple of photos.

My Asiatic lilies are blooming, and I ran across a NH female entrepreneur who is selling an interesting product – ‘Stink’N Cute Septic Vent Cover.’ You take your top piece off and snap her piece on. The cost is $85 plus shipping! Who knows, she may get ‘stinking’ rich’ based upon the number of these blue lollipops you see all over this area. πŸ™‚

About Judy@NewEnglandGardenAndThread

Master Gardener who enjoys gardening, quilting, photography, and traveling.
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70 Responses to Expiration date

  1. tonytomeo says:

    Okay, . . . I would say that is a lame disguise for the septic vent, but it is TOO cool. Silly, but cool, and most of us dig a bit of silly.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I had never seen those blue pipes sticking up until about five years ago, and now they seem to be pretty prevalent up here. I saw quite a few customer photos, all different colors, and all types of small gardens. It made me chuckle so I thought I’d share. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      • tonytomeo says:

        Building codes for the ventilation systems may have changed. Similar vents used to be common in parts of Beverly Hills (in the Los Angeles region) for ventilation of the infrastructure used to extract oil from the Beverly Hills Oil Field. They were sort of weird and mysterious, since no one really knew what was underground within the easements. They are not so prominent anymore, probably because they are now contained within ventilated vaults that are below grade, (with the ‘lids’ of the vaults at sidewalk level, and the vents below).

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Joyce says:

    I keep all my stuff until it dies, too!
    Really have to bite my tongue at the girls’ houses when I see them tossing things like area rugs or pillows because “I just don’t think I like that color anymore!” OK – enough. I feel my BP rising as I type this! And I know, I know….Ann Landers would have said “who raised those vegetables?” ummm…guilty!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I remember a dear friend of my mother’s who was married to an engineer, once said, “beware getting married to an engineer because you’ll never get anything new.” I married one, and it’s true. That being said, he’s also practical enough to know when things just aren’t worth fixing (not that he doesn’t love trying). We don’t have septic tanks around here, but I love the disguise… very clever.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Our generation inherited the reduce, reuse and recycle way of live-ing; it was and is simply the (more) right thing to do! Then again, things were once built to last. We had a ‘fridge here that only faltered just before death at 25 years old! Been cussing out this *new* one since a few months after purchase. My mom’s old Singer is even older. It quit (it had been motorized) a few years ago, but it was past 70, then! It’s hard to part with those things we used so much — I sympathize! Love the lilies, and the vent cover is so Yes!

    Liked by 1 person

    • In my experience, the more bells, whistles, and computers in appliances, they are just things to go wrong and then the service bill is enough to make your eyes roll back in your head. I love your Singer story! My current sewing machine is about 18 years old. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 2 people

      • Agreed. Honestly, I’d be so happy with this old workhorse (now a desk) if I found & installed the right-sized treadle belt! And wow, 18 years (and counting) these days is wonderful for an often-used sewing machine!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Nancy says:

    It is rather cute! She may get stinkin’ rich.
    We buy used and keep it until it can’t run anymore. My sweet man can fix lots of things… but when he can’t… we toss it.
    We aren’t old… just older and Wise!
    Happy Monday my friend!

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Dan Antion says:

    Sorry about the serger. It’s always sad to have to say goodbye to a favorite tool. The daylily is very pretty. I’ll leave you to contemplate the other expiration dates.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Murphy's Law says:

    Growing up during WWII you learned to save everything, to take especially good care of everything, and how to jury-rig to keep something going. My dryer died a few years ago at the age of nineteen. Dishwasher was 26 when she conked out. The washing machine is doing fine at 21.

    But our single handle Moen kitchen faucet FELL APART the other day. Ten years old. WTH? Nope. No fixing it. New one on order. Sigh…….My BP is already out of whack. When I heard what this will cost, BP went into orbit!πŸ€—

    “Neither one of us walked uphill to school both ways” is still cracking me up!! Thanks for the belly laugh!

    More and more lately I am convinced that I have outlived my expiration date! Good thing I’m not a kitchen faucet!! Lol.
    Ginger

    Liked by 1 person

    • We had to have our kitchen faucet replaced about two years ago. It was 13 at the time. My husband went on line, contacted the company, and they sent us a replacement. Good so far, right? We contacted our original plumber and got on the list. It took six weeks, and it was $90 an hour labor. Boy, do I take good care of that faucet. πŸ™‚ Hope your BP settles down and that you get it repaired sooner than later.

      Like

  8. germac4 says:

    My parents just could not believe our ”throw-away” society. They lived in Africa for many years and Dad fixed everything and they grew most of their food. When they came to Australia they could not believe what was being thrown away. They would approve of the way things are changing now..(well, a little bit anyway).
    Your Asiatic Lily is gorgeous!

    Liked by 1 person

    • It is interesting how busy our Goodwill, Salvation Army, and Habitat for Humanity stores are these past few years as people recycle and reuse. My laptop is 8 years old which is ancient in technology years. πŸ™‚ I’d never had Asiatic Lilies until about three or four years ago. I’m really enjoying them.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. But what is the function of the vent? Call me ignorant, but I just paid a lot of money for the current cover — a LOT more than $85 — so why (if?) is this better?

    Liked by 1 person

    • The vent cover has zero function except to look like a part of the landscape versus just sitting there. A friend spray painted their blue vent green to blend in better with their landscape, and I’ve seen faux granite covers for them as well. I would also guess it depends upon where it is located in your yard and whether you have to look at it all day every day. πŸ™‚

      Like

  10. I’m quite frugal but my mom still has placemats from when we were in grade school. That’s farther than I would go, but they also retired when my dad was 55 and are now in their early 90’s so frugality has helped them out! Love the lily and the pump.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. BERNADETTE says:

    Too funny – stinking rich..

    Liked by 1 person

  12. I didn’t grow up poor, but my parents did, and frugality was how we rolled. We repaired and patched and dang were we disgusted when something finally broke down or wore out. And I still am. πŸ˜‰

    Liked by 1 person

    • Our stainless steel refrigerator is 15 years old now. About 8 years ago, the water line stopped working to access the water on the door. The repair was $600. I swore I would never pay that again. Move forward about 4 years ago, and the water line stopped working again, but the ice works. Go figure. I use the ice and have a filtered water container in the frig. That service fee will go towards the replacement refrigerator we’ll have to buy before long. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      • pastpeter says:

        We had a nasty experience with the old water line to our refrigerator. It was 1/4in copper, and kinked where it came through the kitchen wall, leaking invisibly behind the wallboard. The spreading wet patch on the basement ceiling took the local plumber and me 2 days searching to discover the source. By then an 8ft section of ceiling was ruined. It took me weeks to repair… while my carpenter son was in Namibia enjoying working at a wildlife sanctuary for 6weeks! A memorable few weeks for both of us!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Oh, wow, I can imagine the work involved in that scenario. It just seems strange that the water works or we wouldn’t have ice, but the water dispenser won’t dispense water. Oh well, I’m keeping that repair money to put towards the next one, and I’ll get as few bells and whistles as I can. πŸ™‚

        Like

      • How irritating it is when the cost of fixing something is too high to justify the repair. I just hate it. We drive an eleven-year-old Honda Fit. The air conditioner went, and the repair cost is $1,000. Too much. We drive with the windows open. Your filtered water solution sounds perfect. And who knows? You might get many more years out of that refrigerator.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. pbmgarden says:

    There’s often a grace period on those expiration dates at the grocery store but I guess at some point they become real. Hope you find a great sewing solution. Happy Summer.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Judy, we keep things forever, too! My husband is good at fixing most things. Our kitchen fridge is about 30 years old and we have our old harvest gold fridge that still works in the garage!

    Liked by 1 person

  15. slfinnell says:

    And your post is even timely with the change of the season. And denim can really do a number on sewing machines. My nephew’s hem cost me $79 on his $2 garage sale jeans. Very frustrating.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without! From WWI to now, always good practice! My parents never threw a thing away if there was any possible use, and that certainly included food! Love the septic vent!

    Liked by 1 person

    • When I go to the store and there isn’t a blemish on any of the fruit or veggies, I think of my grandmother and how she would use every single piece and just cut around anything she didn’t want. Now, everything has to be perfect. Interesting for sure. That septic vent just made me laugh out loud, and then I applauded the ingenuity of the New England owner who thought of it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • And this purveying of perfection is exactly one of the reasons for so much food waste on this planet.
        The septic vent is hilarious, I’m sure folks looking at it the first time don’t immediately get what it is. I’d love to see the dawning of recognition!

        Liked by 1 person

  17. Eliza Waters says:

    When it rains, it pours, as they say. When machinery, esp. a necessary tool, breaks it can be a big expense to replace. We had to replace our lawn tractor this year, but wow, how awesome it is to use the new one! I didn’t realize how much I had to baby the old one as it limped along. Nothing like a good tool. πŸ™‚
    Cute and clever septic vent cover. When we had to have our leach field redone a dozen years ago, I didn’t want a ‘candy cane’ so we opted for a fiberglass faux stone hitching post. It looks like granite and fools many people, who ask me where I got the vintage post. πŸ™‚ Win!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. My mother was a product of the depression, then WW2 so that gives you an idea of how amazing she was at making things last and stretching just about anything. I inherited that although I do know when to trash an appliance. I remember her refrigerator. It was round topped and at least 40 years old when we got rid of it for a new one. It still worked and those were her words as they wheeled it out.

    Liked by 2 people

  19. Oddment says:

    Of course I loved your musing about expiration dates. It does feel personal some days, doesn’t it? As usual, the comments on your blog are wonderful to read; you really know how to get people comparing notes on life! I could hear all my ancestors applauding as I read everyone’s take on frugality. Thanks for the thoughts!

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Sometimes it’s just time for things to go. I’ve always loved the idea of having a serger, but I just don’t sew enough to justify the expense.

    That pipe disguise is pretty clever and cute. πŸ˜€

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Mr ET will always attempt to fix things before we discard them. He managed to repair our dishwasher three times before it finally keeled over for good. You know that old saying about everything happening in threes? I’m hoping nothing else in your home has given up the ghost.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. I love that orange lily. With tools I have a tendency to try to make them work (or pretend that they work) even when they are not really working. Usually not a good long-term strategy,

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Ally Bean says:

    I dislike buying new machines. Part of it has to do with my mother’s mantra “waste not, want not” and part of it has to do with I hate learning how to use the new machine. I feel your pain.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. With all of your doings, wonderfully chronicled here, something tells me your sell-by date is years off yet. πŸ˜‰ – Marty

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Most everything here is old and on occasion has to be fixed (if I am still using it). I am enjoying the new battery powered hedge trimmers and am soon to get a battery powered trimmer. There is a lot of old stuff here, but what I use is better quality than a lot of the new products available. I am still using dad’s Troy Built Tiller be bought in 1979. If you were to replace your old DR Trimmer with a new one, it likely wouldn’t be as good as the old one. Growing “older” means you have stood the test of time and are actually better for having to go through some of the things we have endured. Like they say, we aren’t getting older, we are getting better… Well, maybe not in every way. πŸ™‚ I hope you are doing well. Thanks for sharing and take care!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I now have a wall of battery powered Craftsman tools including a hedge trimmer and a trimmer. I love them all because it is so much easier and quicker to slap a battery in and get the job done. πŸ™‚ That old DR Trimmer was built like a tank. If it only started and worked, I would have kept it for sure. We are better in a lot of ways, but the body has taken some hits along the way. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      • Dad used to have a DR Trimmer but the motor or something had to be replaced so he got rid of it. He bought the Troy Built Horse in 1979 and it is working on its third motor. I put the last one on last summer. It works great and the newer Troy Built tillers aren’t near as good. You have to pay A LOT of money for a good rear-tine tiller from BCS to have a quality product. My new Stihl FSA 85 trimmer will be here next Wednesday (hopefully). I am still in pretty good shape but I have learned what I can and shouldn’t do physically as I get older. The ligaments in my left bicep came loose last fall and I still haven’t gotten it fixed. I keep putting it off because it seems I have to much to do to stop, have surgery, and go through the rehap process which may take two months… Who is going to take care of the garden, etc. while I am not able? I also have two houses to paint on my list. You never know what lies around the corner…

        Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, timing medical procedures is a real thing between summer and winter hobbies and passions. I applaud your mechanical skills and wish you well on painting not one but two houses. Wow!

        Liked by 1 person

      • I just finished the inside of another house. Took over a month!

        Liked by 1 person

  26. bikerchick57 says:

    Your lilies are gorgeous, Judy, and it’s too bad they also have an expiration date. I have a sewing machine that my dad used when he and mom still lived independently. It might have been time for a replacement, but I rarely use it now, so it could last another 20 years.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Tina Schell says:

    Ah Judy – so true. Let’s hope our own expiration dates are far longer!! And I love the name of the septic cover – LOL for her creativity. This week, unfortunately, we had a fire at our home. Although it only affected a part of the house, the smoke damage throughout the rest was pretty extensive. We had to throw out SO much of our “stuff” based on the restoration company’s concerns about being able to eliminate the odor. It was a great reminder of how important the few things we really care about are, and how much more vigilant we need to be about purging the “stuff”, Tune for a new “serger” whatever that is!!!

    Liked by 1 person

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