Wet and Humid

I’m not a fan of humidity. When we left the Midwest, I thought I’d said goodbye to it, but global warming had other thoughts. So, here I am gardening in NH, and the humidity has been up in the 80-95% range for several days.

In the midst of this wonderful weather, a friend called and asked if MGs were interested in digging up a few plants before she put her house on the market. With shovels and forks, three of us headed over.

A few plants amounted to two full pickups. A wonderful bounty, but then the question arose as to what to do with them until the fall potting party. We stored some that were potted up and heeled the rest in the ground. I’m the proud caretaker of about 70. It’s definitely a good start to next year’s sale.

I remember reading somewhere about sweating versus glistening. I always wanted to glisten, but the reality is I sweat in that kind of humidity. That was why yesterday morning when it started raining while I was finishing a project, I just kept on going.

I planted a small Kousa Dogwood and an Elderberry right off the lawn area which meant I needed to put a tree ring around them to keep weeds out and build a fence around and over to keep hungry animals from snacking. Will that work? We’ll see.

Last Thursday we logged in 2″ of rain, and yesterday Henri dropped a whopping 3/4″. We’re suppose to get more rain today, but it sure doesn’t compare to the scare tactics employed by the local news media. Do you ever picture the news and weather folks gathered around a conference room table or on Zoom trying to figure out what words and photos to use to scare the heck out of us? It gets old.

During my down time, I enjoyed reading “Fallen” by Linda Castillo, “Ocean Prey” by John Sandford, “The Island” by Ben Coes, and I’m almost done with “Dead of Winter” by Stephen Mack Jones. I do love my local library for allowing me to pursue my reading interests and for buying and storing the books I like.

We have a couple of young neighbors across the road who have literally turned their entire yard into a garden. They’re down to mowing strips of grass between garden beds. On Friday, they dropped off a care package. Picture tomatoes that with one slice can cover the bread from side to side. Nice.

While it was raining, I baked some delicious Zucchini Crumb Cake. It’s almost health food, if I forget about the sugar, butter and glaze.

I won’t bore you with my thoughts on Covid, vaccines, and those unwilling to help right this ship, but if you want a good post on the topic check out Marty at Snakes in the Grass.

As I sign off, I’ll borrow a word from my blogging friend, Maureen, and say we’re ‘coping’ with this new wave of cases and some times in life that is the best one can do.

Hope life is going well for you and thanks as always for stopping to chat.

I look at these photos and keep hearing “Raindrops keep fallin’ on my head…” ☔️

About Judy@NewEnglandGardenAndThread

Master Gardener who enjoys gardening, quilting, photography, and traveling.
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65 Responses to Wet and Humid

  1. You have a good crop of plants there.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I decided not to even bother with the weather reports today. I watched the Weather Channel for about ten minutes yesterday and you would have thought it was the hurricane of the century headed our way!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Ally Bean says:

    It’s been more humid here than normal for August. It wears me out, stealing my gumption. I liked what Marty said, too. I agree with Maureen. When you can’t hope, and don’t want to mope, you have to cope. 🤷‍♀️

    Liked by 3 people

  4. Oddment says:

    I cannot imagine where you got the stamina to do that much work in that much hot humidity. It is ditto here and I just came in from the morning watering and deadheading session which was nothing compared to what you did, and I’m thoroughly wilted. Those critters better stay away from those plants in their new home. The zucchini cake looks downright cooling. I got a good laugh from your thoughts on sweating vs glistening and from the Raindrops song. I think your flowers and berries are singing along. I loved Ally’s take on coping! Now I’m going to read what Marty has to say.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Nancy says:

    Oh Judy… you gave me a giggle about the weather people sitting down and thinking up scary words. So very true!
    The humidity has been impossible! You should see my weeds… I refuse to weed in this humidity. And why do they grow better in this humidity??

    So today the FDA is going to approve the Pfizer vaccine. Hopes upon hopes that those who were waiting for this approval will get the poke now. And many Doctors are fed up. I saw some are deciding to not treat those who are not vaccinated. They can’t go through the heartbreak of losing patients especially if they could have gotten the vaccine. It’s all a bit upsetting.

    Your flowers are beautiful my friend… especially with the raindrops. Have a lovely week ahead and stay safe and dry.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The weather has become part of the news entertainment so they become creative with words and screens. But, I swear with all the technology they have at their fingertips, the forecasts are wrong more times than right. You can’t afford to not pay attention, but geez it is laughable. I just saw the final approval came through. I hope it does encourage some to line up. People drink alcoholic beverages, smoke all kinds of ‘stuff,’ eat all kinds of food, take uppers and downers, get tattoos and piercings, but a vaccine to help control a pandemic is too much. Hmm. The last year and a half sure has been interesting, and we’ve learned a lot about folks. Stay well, my friend.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Congratulations on getting all those plants for your plant sale! Humidity! I can relate. These days I can’t take it like I used to.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Joyce says:

    I enjoyed Marty’s post! I guess it’s time to accept that things aren’t returning to normal any time soon. After a few months of blessed no-masking at Mass, our priest announced yesterday that the bishop requested reinstatement of the practice in all diocesan buildings.
    One humorous happening locally, though, is the group of parents who’ve threatened to “pull” their children if schools mandate masking. Wonder how long that will last with their “little darlings” imprisoned at home with them? I’m tempted to comment, “Good! Stay home! More classroom space for the rest of us!”
    It’s hot and humid here, too. Two buildings the grandkids attend – starting today – have no AC. Two years ago there were early year heat warning closings. Would have been difficult to postpone the first day (today), but I see it strongly possible for later this week! Poor district admins, they can’t win!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I loved Marty’s post and ‘his couch.’ I have a chair. 🙂 The mask or no mask issue has sure brought out the ugly in us. People get all fired up for sure, and I just don’t understand why. Would I be glad to be done with them – sure. However, they sure are easy to put on and protect yourself and your neighbor. I hope the temps cool down for the grandkids. I bet you remember those huge windows in Catholic school, and the nuns would pull the top down with that wooden pole with the metal hook on the end. Now, why did I just think of that. 🙂

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  8. Lovely flowers! As for the media-ologists, husband and I are sure that Mike Haddad would love for the real apocalypse to happen in his lifetime! 🤦 Also, I’m thinking only people with yachts “glisten.” Hence, all humidity should be sent their way (or, bring on Fall!).

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think we’d be better off looking out the window to see what the weather brings because as you said the apocalypse is coming. The weather apps are funny too – in 26 minutes rain will start. Not likely. 🙂 I like the idea of sending the humidity to the folks with the yachts. 🙂

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  9. Ally Bean has come up with the quotation of the year, hasn’t she? “When you can’t hope, and don’t want to mope, you have to cope.” Yes, yes! As for the humidity…once upon a time, August used to be the best month ever in Maine, and I expect it was the same for New Hampshire, too. Hot and dry during the day; cool enough for blankets at night. August, beautiful August. Alas, those days seem to be gone, and the humidity of July has crept into August. On the other hand, September seems to be the new August, and we get an extra month of delightful patio time. Anyway, I am in awe of all that you accomplish. When I start whining to myself about all that I have to do, I will keep you in mind.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The quote is perfect!! This humidity is the level of TX which just doesn’t seem right, but I think it’s like other things in that we’re not going back any time soon. I’m guessing the sale of small air conditioners has been booming. Yes, you get more patio time on the back end to enjoy with your daughter.

      Liked by 1 person

      • So true. A few years ago, my hairdresser advised me to get an air conditioner as things were only going to get warmer. Like me, she is a Maine native and has firsthand seen the changes in our climate. I followed her advice and am so glad I did.

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  10. pbmgarden says:

    I’m glad Henri hasn’t been an issue there. You sure have your hands full with all those plants. If you want someone to hold that tomato sandwich while you get busy… 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  11. I love your colourful flower photos! “Coping’ is indeed the best word for describing how we are getting through new surges in Covid cases.
    You have a mighty impressive stash of plants in readiness for your sale. Good luck with that!
    We have our own stash of plants ready to sell at our village street fair in September.

    Liked by 1 person

    • We had that short window here in June when the numbers were not climbing, but now we’re back in the Covid soup again with cases increasing, deaths, and hospitals pretty full. A village street fair with plant sales sounds like an absolutely perfect September activity. I hope it is a huge success. A gardener can never have too many plants.

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  12. Murphy’s Law says:

    Your flowers always put a smile on my face! Your neighbors sound swell… and so do their tomatoes 🍅! What a nice surprise care package.

    We were spared the worst of Henri, but the rain has worn out its welcome, as has the humidity. In between storms when you can be outside for a few minutes, the biting insects are practicing cannibalism!!

    Bravo to you and the other two MG’s for braving the heat and humidity to dig up all those plants that now have to be nurtured until the plant sale. Can’t decide if you’re all dedicated MG’s or just plain nuts! 🤣🤣

    Hope you’re taking some time to rest and recuperate.
    Ginger

    Liked by 1 person

    • A garden care package is always a good thing. I forgot to mention the insects that come along with the humidity. We’ve had West Nile here in the state, and the other morning I was outside in this one spot that stays kind of damp, and I had mosquitos flying all over me. I had to go back in and spray my hat and clothes with bug spray to even stay out there. It’s the gardening nerd in me, but when someone says come dig, boy howdy, I’m digging. 🙂

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  13. Eliza Waters says:

    Although we must do our prep, because ‘what if’ uncertainty rules, I am glad that we got off easy with Henri. The hype does require a grain of salt!
    Looks like a nice start for the plant sale, glad you had a team to help.
    I’m thinking to do some major work on a perennial bed that has morphed way out of control and needs an overhaul. The digging out won’t be much fun, but the replanting will. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • That’s right – ‘what if.’ I don’t want to see hanging baskets flying into my neighbor’s yard and creating a problem so… I always laugh at myself when I think I have a bed just right and then find myself digging up things the next year to move them around. In my case, it comes from getting a new plant and thinking I’ll just put it here ‘until’ and then I forget to move it and wonder the next year why I have it there. I’ve been adding a few more shrubs so then I find extras I need to put somewhere. Oh well, it gives us something to do and enjoy.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Dan Antion says:

    Good job snagging those plants, and being willing to store them for the sale. That’s good worek all around.

    I think I’d prefer working in the rain than in the heat and humidity of some of the recent heatwaves we’ve had, Judy. I love the photo of the drops hanging off the wire, and your thoughts about the weather men and women deciding how to blow the storm hype higher than catergory-1.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Working in the rain was kind of a break from the humidity which tells you how high the humidity was that morning. 🙂 I watched the local news this morning as they said Henri had moved out and the day was going to be dry and clear. When I looked out the window, it was pouring down rain. A sense of humor is needed at all times. 🙂

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  15. I was wondering if/how Henri would affect you. Indeed the forecasts are almost always worse than what actually happens. It’s one of the reasons why so many here in FL end up staying put, while the rest of the country thinks we’re nuts (which admittedly we often are!). But because TV weather gurus need ominous stories to get those viewers, the storm forecasts aren’t always equal to what’s actually happening outside. Here’s hoping the humidity eases up, though glistening is never a bad thing. 😉

    Thanks for the shout-out. Much appreciated! – Marty

    Liked by 2 people

    • I just looked at a weather app which says ‘no precipitation for at least 60 minutes.’ The only issue is, it’s raining right now. 🙂 The local news also announced this morning that we should get our Christmas shopping done because deliveries may not get our purchases to us in time. Really? You’re welcome – in my humble opinion, it was a great post.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. It’s even been wet and humid here, Judy, which is quite a change. In the two weeks we were gone, the desert has turned green everywhere, our cacti look as though they’ll burst, and the bushes are crying out for pruning. We even, unfortunately, have mosquitoes trolling for blood. I’m glad you survived the storm scare and thanks for not going to the Covid controversy. I sweat rather than glow myself. 🙂

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  17. I can handle heat to a point, but the humidity is the killer, isn’t it? (Hyperbole? moi?)

    We’ve been under the influence of a heat wave, too – hotter in this latitude than further south, which makes me uncomfortable in more ways than one. But fortunately, that dang blang hurricane Henri helped us out yesterday with a goodly amount of cloud cover and a decent cooling breeze from the north.

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  18. We sometimes get humidity where we are but I imagine you’d laugh at what we SoCal wimps consider humid. I hope it cools down for you soon and Henri continues to pass you by. I sometimes wonder if the weather people ever regret the worry they cause… but I expect they are too busy looking for the next disaster to report about.

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  19. germac4 says:

    Lovely post Judy, what a great idea for someone to donate plants before moving house. Often beloved plants are left to die off if the house is not sold to a gardener. I love your flowers in the rain too, flowers always look to me as if they are smiling when there is rain (maybe that is after many years of drought.) I’d say we are coping with this pandemic…I guess it makes us resilient and I try not to plan too far ahead. (but would love to see our cute little grandchildren soon).
    I also enjoyed reading the link to Marty’s Snake in the Grass post, and all the comments.. great to find out more about the world from bloggers. Enjoy that lovely cake, and stay safe and cool.

    Liked by 2 people

    • That is so true about selling a house. This homeowner had unbelievable gardens, but the average person might not be that into so much to take care of. She knew that we use our proceeds to fund school gardening grants so she was also happy with where they were going. It was a win win even if it was a hot and muggy one. 🙂 Oh my, missing those little grandchildren hugs is really hard. When I think about my grands being young, that is my visual – running pell mell to throw their arms around my neck. Great memories. Covid sure has impacted all of us from every corner of the world, and it is pretty amazing how different the responses are to it. Yes, I enjoyed that cake and today I didn’t stay out long because the humidity was 91%. Ghastly humid.

      Liked by 1 person

  20. Zucchini crumb cake sounds amazing. I might have to look up a recipe now. Michigan is going back up in cases so we’ll probably hunker down again for the fall/winter. I’ve made it this long not getting sick (thanks masks and vaccines!) and I intend to keep that momentum going. I thought I was going to start a vegetable garden this year but it was just too hectic, I really wish I had now though.

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  21. Judy, your garden must be a constant source of pleasure in these difficult times. I know it gives me great joy to read your posts and see your latest works. Speaking of protecting your precious plants from animals, I put out some cosmos seedlings a couple of weeks and I’ve been nurturing them with some water every morning. They have been flourishing and looking great – until something ate four of them. 😦 I’m blaming the blue tongue lizard who’s taken up residence in my garden. Also 😦 about that because he gives me a fright sometimes when I first see him and think he’s a snake.

    Liked by 1 person

    • When chaos is all around and you have zero control over anything, it is a relief to work in the garden. This humidity absolutely drains me though, but I guess it helps me sleep at night. 🙂 I’m nurturing some cosmos stems trying to see if I can propagate them so I understand. The lizard did make me smile because a couple of weeks ago I opened the shed door to find a snake had been resting right under the door. He definitely gave me a fright. I don’t do snakes and I probably wouldn’t appreciate lizards either. 🙂

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  22. If you’re not a fan of humidity, don’t visit Tennessee right now. We’re sweltering! And I’m having AC problems. Your flowers are lovely — and that makes hot summer days almost bearable!

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  23. bikerchick57 says:

    Hi Judy! That is quite the haul of plants for the garden and you certainly had your work cut out for you. I have not been happy with the heat, humidity and high dewpoints this summer, which has led to monsoon downpours rather than a regular old rainy day. I am truly looking forward to autumn this year and the relief it might bring. I would love to have my windows open and feel the fresh air rather than more of the A/C.

    The zucchini crumb cake looks delicious, despite the butter and sugar. I’d eat that!

    Liked by 1 person

  24. BERNADETTE says:

    I am right there with you sister when it comes to humidity. I live in New Jerey which has become the new Florida. As if New Jersey’s humidity wasn’t bad enough!

    Liked by 1 person

  25. I love tomatoes fresh from the yard and your neighbor’s sound wonderful and huge!

    Your flowers are gorgeous. I hope the rain stops there and comes our way! We sure could use it.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. joey says:

    You are just so my “GARDENING GOALS” as the kids would say. Lovely photos. Good luck with your new trees/bushes!
    I also sweat when I’d prefer to glisten. I turn a lovely bright red, which makes everyone unfamiliar with Summer Me believe I need medical attention. Hence my love for all the other seasons.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you. 🙂 You’ll have a little more garden planning time this fall. I hope she has a wonderful college experience and all her personal and professional goals get met. It’s hard to let them go, but so rewarding to see them make a good life for themselves.

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  27. Annie says:

    And I, too, thought I’d escaped the wrath of humidity when I moved from Virginia to New Hampshire. I could not have dug and stored all those plants for MG. Hats off to you!

    Liked by 1 person

  28. I also hate hot, humid weather. I have been staying out of the garden lately because of a hot and humid stretch of days – except for a brief bit of watering and deadheading, etc. Mostly staying in reading, playing cards, etc.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The weather has been really strange this year and many days are miserable out there. I’ve read so many books it’s a good thing my local library is less than ten minutes from here or I’d be broke. Hope you’ve found some good reads along the way.

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  29. Karen says:

    When I read your posts like this one talking about the heat, humidity and weather forecasters almost gleeful about an impeding storm…it sounds like you are in Florida and not the New Hampshire and Maine I remember. Yes, we would get the occasional heat wave but not often. When we had visitors come to our summer cottage in Maine in July or August, we would tell them to pack a sweatshirt. I’m sure they thought we were crazy but you needed one first thing in the morning or late evening. How things have changed. Hopefully your fall will be a delightful one.

    Liked by 1 person

    • You make very good points. As a child, I remember warm days in the 80’s and cool nights. We moved here about 19 years ago and remember summer weather that included open windows. Now, the A/C runs 24/7 and when I open the door there is a wall of heat and humidity. The weather has certainly changed. Stay well.

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  30. Ogee says:

    The rain and humidity have delivered a beautiful and bountiful garden. Thank you for sharing…I live vicariously through our glistening sweat!

    Liked by 1 person

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