Fall Color

New England winter is white or brown, spring is green, summer is a colorful array, and fall, well, fall is gold, orange, and red. It’s a beautiful thing.

We received 3 1/2″ of rain last week in about a 36 hour period. A lot of those leaves are now on the ground awaiting cleanup. The topic of cleaning up leaves in the fall has become as divisive as politics. There will be no preaching here except to say we clean the leaves off the lawn areas but leave them on the gardens.

The canna and dahlia bulbs have been dug, cleaned, and stored for the winter. The daffodil bulbs are being planted this morning along with the final deadheading of the sedums. Deadheading in the fall is another topic that can get a lot of press. I’m not a fan of beds of mushy plant material that has to be raked out in the spring after sitting under feet of snow, but everyone to their own gardening choices.

Who knew gardening could be such a hot topic on social media with folks taking sides and getting quite vocal about choices. Gardening is a hobby and as such I think everyone should just do it their way.

I read a lot, and I’m grateful for my local library. Recently, I had several holds become available, and I was in reading heaven.

Here’s hoping you have a great week whether you are reading a good book, working in your garden, or enjoying another hobby.

I’ll be either outside or at the sewing machine – both good places for me. 🙂

About Judy@NewEnglandGardenAndThread

Master Gardener who enjoys gardening, quilting, photography, and traveling.
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76 Responses to Fall Color

  1. Oddment says:

    These photos are wonderful! I can almost feel the air. The images with the water are very soothing, and that field with the expanse of sky over it helped me take a deep breath. I might have to come back to that from time to time! Congratulations on the good reads — a good book and a garden are tonic for the spirit.

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  2. Beautiful images Judy! We’ve had a stunning year here, and luckily, even though we had lots of rain and some intense winds, many of the leaves are still on the trees.
    Thank you for reminding me I’ve got to get those bulbs in!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. We are just starting to have great color here. No hard frost (some spotty ones but it didn’t hit my flowers) yet but this week I’ll start to pull the annuals. No point in waiting until I freeze my tush off. Blooming is stunted with cool night time temps. There is a beauty about fall with the knowledge that in a few weeks it will be brown.

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  4. Syt says:

    Pictures are beautiful

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Murphy’s Law says:

    Wonderful fall snapshots. Always a beautiful season. I like my little garden trimmed back and cut down before winter comes down on it. Trees here have some color, but not as vivid as previous years. Still beautiful though. Lots of leaves on the ground!

    Have fun outside, sewing or reading that great stack of books. I made note of the titles to add to my hold list at the library!🤗
    Ginger

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  6. Those are beautiful images!! Fall is gorgeous there.

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  7. Judy, your beautiful images of your gorgeous fall colors just made my morning! You and I share a love of reading and enjoy many of the same authors.

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  8. Yesterday we drove past a local marsh. So beautiful but no time to stop and take a photo. Fall in NE is just the very best, eh!

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  9. Eliza Waters says:

    It has been a glorious fall this year, I’ve really appreciated the abundance of vibrant color. Have a great week, Judy!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Ally Bean says:

    Your photos are magnificent. Those colors! Autumn isn’t quite in full showiness here, yet. You and my husband are on the same page about deadheading. I’m a bit more laid-back about the whole issue.

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  11. Nancy says:

    Your photos are spectacular and filled with Autumn Color. It’s been a beautiful fall here in Pennsylvania. And we are so happy we stayed to see it.
    I too have been deadheading and cleaning up the yard here and there. The leaves are still on the trees.
    Enjoy your time inside and outside … looking forward to what you are making at the sewing machine.
    I also am looking at your book titles for my future reading.
    Happy Fall Judy!

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Sandford book was a good read, and I can’t remember the last time Davenport and Flowers shared the stage equally. Archer Mayor and Allen Eskens write a good book also. You are a lucky woman to enjoy the seasons on both coasts, and you make the most of it all.

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  12. In New England, October is month that brings joy to the heart. Just looking out my living room window, I see a blaze of yellow glory. As for gardening…I’m with you all the way about being relaxed about when you do what. It’s just not something I can get flapped about. There are so many other things… I wait until spring to clean the gardens. In the fall, we clean up the leaves. We also mow in the summer. I have a snake phobia—dang, it all!—and I need to be able to see whats coming across the yard. 😉

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  13. Su says:

    Your pictures are wonderful. We saw beautiful color on our New England road trip. Upstate/western New York was also very colorful. Even on grey days the trees seemed to radiate color. We seem to have similar tastes – gardening preferences, sewing, books. Have you read any of the series by Louise Penny?

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    • I’m so glad you had a good trip with plenty of color to enjoy. I have not read Louise Penny so I just went onto the library website and put a hold on one. I had to go through several before I found one available so I’m guessing many others are enjoying her books as well. Thank you for the tip – much appreciated.

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  14. Joyce says:

    Rain and beautiful color here, too, with snow expected tomorrow! With not a lot of places to go, I don’t really mind because my quilting/reading chair awaits, as does yours!
    Had to chuckle over gardeners arguing over best methods! I think these normally peaceful, nurturing people see politicians having “fun” and want to join in the action! I wasn’t aware of dissent in the ranks until a hostile Facebook comment popped up in my non-gardening feed for some unknown reason: “they are called ‘leaves’ for a reason!” Yikes. I’d hate to be her neighbor. My retired husband literally sits at the window waiting for the first one to fall so he can grab his rake and snag it!

    Liked by 1 person

    • YES – the leaves are a hot topic, and it makes me laugh every time. I understand they are habitats for various critters, but we just deposit them on the property borders where they compost. Besides, who wants to reseed every spring, not me. I belong to a couple of NH gardening groups on FB so I read these impassioned comments about leaves and native plants and just shake my head. Gardening should not be such a restricted activity. Enjoy it, however you want to do it. I imagine living in a wooded area like you do that your hubby can keep that rake humming for several weeks. Oh well, it beats driving to the gym. Take care and stay well.

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  15. My idea of Fall’s cleanup is removing stray basketballs, tree limbs, branches, hidden water bottles, kid rakes– stuff that could hobble/kill someone while slaloming through the orange and gold yards. (Leaves? What leaves? I see nussing, as Schultzie would say!) And what beautiful photos!

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  16. Sylvia says:

    Love your share! Thank you for helping me to consider raking or not to rake! Made me laugh!

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Spring is my favorite time of the year, but I really cannot argue with those colors you’re showing up there. Beautiful! I hate it when all of my holds come in at once. Hope you can get through all of those books! – Marty

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  18. I’ve read the Hillerman, Box, and Flynn books. 🙂 Really enjoyed your colorful shots. I’m hoping there will be color in Illinois when I head back there in just over a week. At least it will be nice and cool. This morning it was 58 when I went out to walk, which was absolutely lovely!!! 🙂

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  19. germac4 says:

    Wonderful photos of your fall, Judy. However, the problems of the leaves are something I have not thought much about, so…. with such beauty comes hard work! Good luck with the gardening, and enjoy your great pile of books.

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  20. The colours are so beautiful, Judy. I’m with you on the deadheading. I’d rather just do it and get it over and done with. Have you read any of Jane Harper’s books? She’s an Australian author and her work is great. You need to read them in publishing order.

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  21. Gorgeous colors, Judy! Funny how we all have strong opinions about EVERYTHING nowadays, especially on social media. Enjoy your reading bliss!

    Liked by 1 person

    • You are so right about strong opinions about everything. Who knew people could feel so strongly about leaves, but they sure get in your face if you say you pick them up. So, I’ve learned to read comments in gardening groups but refrain from commenting. Whatever works for a peaceful day is good for me.

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  22. Dan Antion says:

    Beautiful colors, Judy and it sounds like you squeezed a lot of work in around those rainy days. I am starting to rake leaves, but not at a fever pitch. I’ll probably rake up a couple bags a week, just to try and get ahead of it. Good luck with the weather for 4-6 more weeks.

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  23. Marilyn says:

    Like you choice of books.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It was a couple of weeks of mighty good reading material. 🙂

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      • mjmgot@aol.com says:

        Have you read any of the Reacher books since the son has been authoring them?  Larry read one and didn’t like it.  I think it was the first book by the son.

        Sent from the all new AOL app for iOS

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      • I thought he was the son too, but they are actually brothers. I did read one of theirs that was really not good. It’s a bummer when you just know a certain series is going to be a good read, but it isn’t. I love John Sandford, but his book, “The Investigator,” about Davenport’s daughter, Letty, was a stinker because it was way too far fetched. His last one, “Righteous Prey,” was one of his best.

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  24. It was a very short but brilliantly beautiful fall, wasn’t it? One day it was almost fall and a few days later, everything lit up for just about 10 days … until the rains came. We still have some colors, but mostly, we’re past peak. Just a little past. You pictures are beautiful!

    We clear off the lawns but mostly leave the gardens. Frankly, our gardens are such a disaster, cleaning or not cleaning them doesn’t make much of a difference.

    This year with no rain all summer, the only thing to survive the drought are the hideous strangling vines. They have taken over the garden and a big portion of the woods. It is like a giant kraken coming out of the earth. If there was any way to kill off those vines, I’d do it in a heartbeat. Even the deer won’t eat them. The entire purpose of those vines is to strangle everything else.

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    • Timely comment, Marilyn. I spent one afternoon this week pulling and digging up bittersweet vines. I have one more day to finish a small area. I had to use pruning loppers just to cut it into pieces which I then had to unwind to get it off. Then, of course, came the digging and pulling of the root system which is something to behold with its long orange tentacles and white short roots. Some of the ones I pulled went 5′ or more. Invasive vines are a formidable foe for a gardener especially a senior one.

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      • We had three dead trees behind the house taken down yesterday and the best outcome was that it destroyed a gigantic clump of wild grape vine. We are overwhelmed by those vines. I managed everything else, but these vines are beyond me. We cut them down to the ground in the fall and they usually don’t come back until at least some of the spring flowers have bloomed. After that, though, except for trying to keep it from strangling the Japanese maple, it has won. There’s no way that any of us can manage this. I won’t use poison, but I can really see why one would want to use it on these monsters. We dealt with wild vines before,, but they were nothing compared to the wild grape and bittersweet — which, in my opinion is very bitter and not one bit sweet!

        Liked by 1 person

      • I spent three more hours yesterday digging the last of the bittersweet in one area. The roots on that plant are just unbelievable, and it’s humanly impossible to get them all when you dig them up. I got all I could. I haven’t had to deal with wild grape vine, and I’m grateful.

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      • We had a problem with wild grapevine when I was growing up in New York. It totally overgrew our woods and it’s BIG. It grows almost tree-sized vines and they strangle big trees, like maples and smaller oaks. Worse of all, nothing eats them. We didn’t have them until a couple of years ago, but once it gets started, it’s the biggest, meanest strangling vine of them all. Truly like giant green kraken!

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  25. joey says:

    I rake and The Mister blows our leaves into the beds. I actually like pulling away the dense, rotten debris in the spring when the pips are up (not in snow) and then I put that muck behind the boxwoods and hydrangeas. I do like hearing how other people do things, because learning, but I’m not one to bark about other people’s processes, either.
    New England falls are the MOST glorious. I keep saying we’ll head that way in fall, but it has yet to pan out. We’re lucky enough to get away into our own woods 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Well, hello, there! Nice to see you. There are pluses and minuses about all approaches, and you are so right that gardeners can always learn something and then decide if they want to try it. Hope you and all the family are well and the kids are all still pursuing their dreams. Take care of yourself and those special folks.

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  26. slfinnell says:

    Sewing weekend here except maybe more cutting/prepping than sewing…til tomorrow 😉

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  27. Judy, what a New England portfolio!
    We have had rain and are still behind as it takes as lot of extra wet to make up for the ten inches we lacked this summer. The foliage here is the most lovely I can remember; maybe the late rains and early cold helped. Usually here the trees are muted, then drop their leaves. I hope we have some color left after the rain so I can get out and take more photos!

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    • We have one maple that has dropped about half of its gorgeous yellow leaves, and it looks like the tree has a skirt. Fall is an interesting and colorful season that is for sure. We have been getting some much needed rain, but as you said it takes a while to make up for drought conditions.

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      • I have a complex relationship with both Hillermans. That said, I think Tony wrote better novels and caught Navajo culture better. Seems a lot like a franchise now.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, the rain has been lovely and we have had quite a lot but not enough. There’s a conundrum, eh? Here about half her trees are still greenish while there is unusually good color in others. This is turning out to be a very slow paced autumn, beginning cold and being very warm for the last week or two.

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  28. Oh! I am undecided about Anne Hillerman. I’m curious as to your thoughts.

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    • I enjoyed the cast of characters and the simultaneous mysteries going on. I had watched the Dark Wind series and enjoyed it so decided to try one of the books. It’s always nice to have a little learning associated with a specific culture included in a mystery book.

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  29. There is probably no place that beats your area for color, Judy. Beautiful! You make me laugh about leaf pick-up and politics! Gardening too. We’re all a bit too touchy would you agree! Opinions are like noses, everybody has one! 😂 Thanks for sharing your lovely fall with us!

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  30. People who say you shouldn’t rake your leaves probably live somewhere where they have “a” tree in their front yard. I live in a clearing in the forest, and if I don’t blow the leaves out of the yard, I will not have grass of any kinds of plants next spring.

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  31. Tina Schell says:

    Oh I was so excited to see your beautiful autumn leaves until I read that the rain had forced so many to the ground. Then I remembered what follows fall in New England and reminded myself of why I moved south. That said, I do so miss northern autumns so thank you for the fond reminder. May your winter be mild and short Judy!

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  32. bikerchick57 says:

    Hi Judy. You have such amazing autumn color in New England. I’m glad you are able to enjoy such beauty before having to rake it up. You are right – gardening is up to each of us individually and there really isn’t a lot of right and wrong to it as long as your “babies” survive and grow.

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  33. pbmgarden says:

    Your New England color is stunning Judy. After what looked like a dud fall here the leaves have been quite showy (the dry weather?). Happy reading and sewing.

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