September gardening

I gardened last week until I had to take the weekend off and rest a little so I could anticipate another week of fall chores. 🙂

Last Wednesday, thirteen Master Gardeners gathered to divide, label and pot up almost 400 donated plants to overwinter for next year’s plant sale. Besides digging two large containers full of plants, I also have 65 plants potted up here at home to overwinter. Speaking of which, I need to get those in the ground.

When gardeners gather, they always bring a few extra plants to share. I was gifted with some more Annabelle Hydrangeas and a Sum and Substance Hosta. The Annabelles, with their 10-12″ flower heads, were added to the current grouping by the side porch, but to make room for the Sum and Substance, which is 3’x6′, I had to clear a large area.

A couple of ice packs, a few Aleve, a good book, and a little sewing on a couple of new mug rugs kept me busy inside.

It was unreal following the coverage of Irma and then looking out at the beautiful weather we were having here in New England. Prayers and positive thoughts for our fellow citizens in Florida. I hope next weekend brings boring fall weather to all the states.

Speaking of tragedies, September 11th is never a date you forget where you were or all those lost. Continued peace and prayers to all the affected families.

We did spend some time out and about car shopping this weekend, which in my book is right up there with having a root canal which can sometimes be more enjoyable. So, if you’ve bought an SUV recently, and you really like it, please tell me because you could save me some additional misery this week.

For those not trudging off to a workplace, what’s on your agenda this week? I’ll be back outside until it’s time to head off to the car dealers. Maybe I’ll just have a too much digging to do? 🙂 Have a happy and safe Monday.


Photo credits:
Annabelle Hydranges: Michigan Bulb
Sum and Substance Hosta: NH Hostas

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Posted in Gardening | Tagged , , , , , | 46 Comments

Genealogy

A while ago, my husband and I did the Ancestry DNA test. The results tend to get your mind to cranking, and you wonder what information is out there regarding your family.

FamilySearch.org provides a free, easy to use website where you can create a family tree. It has a lot of information, but the holder of the information is Ancestry.com. They have it all, but they charge to access it. However, they do give you two free weeks with an automatic charge coming on that last day. If you sign in the day before and cancel the subscription you can avoid the $10-35 charge on your account depending upon which service you signed up for.

If you have some free time, two weeks really is quite a bit of time to research. You may not be able to get everything finalized, but you can round up a lot of information from census reports, city directories, marriage and death certificates, military and criminal records, grave sites, newspaper articles – it’s all there.

If you get lucky, you might even hit a part of the tree that someone else has spent a tremendous amount of time researching. When I clicked on my maternal grandmother’s side of the family, someone had traced them back to early 1500’s in England, Sr. William Bell and Lady Joan Matthew, with family emigrating to Roxbury, Massachusetts, and the rest as they say is history.

Whether you want to pay for the service or do it free of charge, your work stays on line and accessible to you. Information on deceased people is public while information on living people is private.

I’m not promoting anything, but if you do get the bug to do a little searching, there’s definitely a lot of info out there available. Happy Tuesday. 🙂

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Posted in Family | Tagged , , , , | 40 Comments

End of Summer

As we head into Labor Day weekend even I have to admit summer is over. The night-time temperatures have dropped into the 40’s. Can you hear that noise? It’s me whining. 🙂

The gardens are still looking good, and I’m still giving tomatoes away as fast as I can.

I’ve been moving some plants around because that’s what gardeners do. We get them just right, and then the next gardening season arrives, and a great need arises from within to tweak the plan just a bit. 🙂 Next week I start the big dig for the fall potting party for our 2018 Master Gardener plant sale.

We’ve also been doing a little DIY in the form of adding an extra brace to our raspberry support, painting everything, installing new support wire, and painting and installing some trellises for the new blackberry bushes. We’re also sanding and painting our front door, side door and a variety of trim pieces. Time to buckle everything up before the winter.

Last week, we were up in the lakes region visiting friends and stopped to snap a photo of this beautiful barn. You don’t see many fully restored barns painted lavender, orange and gold, but it is beautiful. Consider this my Thursday Doors contribution, so you’re getting a holiday break from me. 🙂

With the long weekend and the throng of tourists, we stay close to home. I’ve got a couple of sewing projects, a good book, and I’m guessing we will visit the park for a picnic and a little time in the sun by the water. Life is good.

Now, if we could just wave a magic wand and ask Mother Nature to turn off the water tap in Texas and surrounding areas and give our fellow citizens a break. We have family in Houston, and thankfully they are all well and dry. Once there is a break in this terrible deluge, may the many thousands affected have the ability to get back home and the strength to get their lives and homes back on track. Labor Day – I think that may be exactly what it will be this weekend for them.

Have a good weekend, enjoy yourselves, and stay safe. 💗

Linked to Norm Frampton’s Thursday Doors, August 31, 2017, being hosted this week by Jolene Mottern. Thursday Doors is a worldly adventure – Canada one week and Indianapolis the next. 🙂 Check it out. 

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Posted in New England | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 53 Comments

Thursday Doors

Here are some doors, residential and historic, from Post Road in the small town of Greenland, New Hampshire.

In the early 1600’s, Greenland was a parish of Portsmouth but was incorporated in 1704. The current population is around 3,500.

Greenland is a lovely little New England town with a wonderful greenhouse, Rolling Green Nursery. I just happened to be there yesterday picking up a hardy hibiscus so I decided to walk down Post Road and check out the doors.

Plantscursion + doorscursion = fun afternoon. 🙂 Have a great Thursday. I’ll be in the garden finding a good spot for that hibiscus.

As always Thursday Doors from all over the world can be found at Norm Frampton’s Thursday Doors, August 24, 2017.

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Posted in New England, Photography, Thursday Doors | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 34 Comments

Mid August Gardening

Second eye surgery – ✓. All I’m waiting for now is time to see how it all works out and what type of glasses I may need.  (pun intended)

Last week, we received a gift of blackberries from our friends up north. It takes a generous man to pick two pails of blackberries and then gift them. 🙂 After sharing and freezing plenty, I made a pie to enjoy. A couple of weeks ago, I visited a fellow master gardener who had this amazing bush with beautiful fruit. So, I  ordered three Triple Crown Thornless Blackberry plants from Stark Brothers. They arrived in great shape, and I have them planted and look forward to future harvests.

I feel a little garden frenzy this time of year because I’m starting to see a few leaves blowing around along with a some maple leaves turning red. I know the vast majority of folks love fall, but here there is a lot of work involved in moving all the leaves that fall from the mature trees on almost four acres. It reminds me of housework – yuck. 🙂

While fall approaches, we are still enjoying a bumper crop of tomatoes. It has been amazing what plenty of compost and fertilizer do for tomato plants. I’ve been giving them away by the dozens. My family, neighbors, and even my eye doctor have been pretty happy.

Over the weekend, I checked the clearance racks in the garden center at Home Depot. I bought two plants, Lil’l Bang Red Elf Coreopsis and Buzz Magenta Buddleia Hybrid, and divided them into six. Oh, I do love doing that. Who could resist a red Coreopsis and a dwarf butterfly bush? Not me.

If you’re a gardener who looks for new plants, here’s a good post from fellow blogger, Laidback Gardener, in Canada. I was doing okay reading through his post until I hit dwarf ‘Annabelle’ hydrangea. Now, that caught my eye.

My garden is still a buzz with pollinators. They love the regular sized butterfly bushes, the hydrangeas and the phlox. If you’re looking for me this morning, I’ll be puttering outside. Happy Monday from my garden to yours. 🙂

 

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Posted in Gardening, New England | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 35 Comments

To Rule A Garden…Or More

Your Saturday may be a little sunnier if you take a moment to read this. 🌺

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Gardens For Goldens

“Anybody who wants to rule the world should try to rule a garden first.” ~ Author Unknown

I found this unattributed quote and it struck me as true. Nothing humbles like a garden – a tiny microcosm of the world where distinct forces work best in harmony, but are sometimes pushed into doing battle for survival and the chance to ensure future generations.

I’m not really sure that anyone ever rules the garden; to assume so would tempt Mother Nature’s scorn. But to tame and transform a garden calls upon many of the same qualities required of great leaders.

1. Collaboration
A successful garden requires a close union with nature. To be truly connected to the earth demands a genuine interest and care for the welfare of all who live there: the flowers and trees, the birds, bees, butterflies, and tiny toads. Each has a role in the lasting success…

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Posted in Gardening | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 17 Comments

Wordless Wednesday

Posted in Photography, Wordless Wednesday | Tagged , , , , , , , | 24 Comments